Archive Interview: PVC16

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Speaker 1:

interviewerPVC16

Speaker 2:

informantPVC16a

Age Group:

16-20

Gender:

Female

Residence:

Tyneside - Newcastle (born in Pakistan)

Education:

GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education)

Occupation:

Student

Speaker 3:

informantPVC16b

Age Group:

16-20

Gender:

Female

Residence:

Tyneside - Newcastle

Education:

GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education)

Occupation:

Student

Themes

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  Interview Transcript

Speaker 2:

(unclear) about your childhood (pause) that you enjoyed the most

Speaker 3:

ehm I couldn't really tell you (NAME) because well probably going to school (laughter)

Speaker 2:

mine as well we used to go together remember

Speaker 3:

aye remember Wingrove

Speaker 2:

oh how could I forget it man

Speaker 3:

aye you used to beat me up all the time

Speaker 2:

no I never don't lie

Speaker 3:

yes you did (laughter) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

(unclear) I still s like all the teachers have changed now man honestly (interruption) there's not one teacher

Speaker 3:

do you remember Miss (NAME)

Speaker 2:

I don't remember Miss (NAME) I remember Miss Miss Mrs (NAME) and Mrs (NAME)

Speaker 3:

oh I think that was her

Speaker 2:

yeah

Speaker 3:

with black pitch black hair

Speaker 2:

yeah

Speaker 3:

bob cut

Speaker 2:

yeah bob cut yeah

Speaker 3:

God petrified of her she reminded me of a witch

Speaker 2:

oh

Speaker 3:

she looked so wicked man

Speaker 2:

she she must have left don't know what happened to her

Speaker 3:

mm

Speaker 2:

they've all changed now even the head teacher's changed

Speaker 3:

mm I know

Speaker 2:

mm-hm

Speaker 3:

I changed school I went to Canning Street

Speaker 2:

why

Speaker 3:

because I liked it there better

Speaker 2:

yous moved didn't yous

Speaker 3:

no I I lived in Canning Street but I went to Canning Street school as well I liked it there had some good friends

Speaker 2:

but yous lived in our street for a while remember

Speaker 3:

yeah I lived in your (interruption) street yeah

Speaker 2:

that's where you went to Wingrove

Speaker 3:

yeah (interruption) Canning Street was (unclear)

Speaker 2:

it was only for a couple of weeks though wasn't it

Speaker 3:

yeah

Speaker 2:

mm (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

didn't enjoy Wingrove

Speaker 2:

did you not

Speaker 3:

no I rather liked it I liked it better in ehm Canning Street had more friends there

Speaker 2:

when did you move from Canning Street then

Speaker 3:

when did I move

Speaker 2:

yeah

Speaker 3:

you mean when did I move to my new house

Speaker 2:

yeah

Speaker 3:

about five years ago I live (unclear) for about (pause) at the Benwell side about (pause) couple of years (pause) eh about we lived there for six years

Speaker 2:

six years my God we've been living in the same house for (pause) fifteen years (pause) (interruption) same place

Speaker 3:

no not me (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

I wouldn't want to move I swear to God it would (interruption) be dead

Speaker 3:

I know I know it would be so different if you went to a different town

Speaker 2:

(unclear) different town

Speaker 3:

it wouldn't be like

Speaker 2:

even to a different area

Speaker 3:

I know it wouldn't be like home it's like my friends are here you're so familiar

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

you know you like (pause) everything's just so (pause) so homely

Speaker 2:

I know I know

Speaker 3:

I'd hate to move somewhere else

Speaker 2:

I know I mean

Speaker 3:

suppose you had to go over (unclear) Gosforth or Jesmond

Speaker 2:

no I wouldn't like that

Speaker 3:

I wouldn't

Speaker 2:

I wouldn't like a total change I w I would stay in the Fenham area

Speaker 3:

mm

Speaker 2:

I like it here because I know everyone round here

Speaker 3:

yeah I know

Speaker 2:

and it's a laugh as well

Speaker 3:

I know

Speaker 2:

and plus school friends

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

and plus I d I don't think I could ever live anywhere else

Speaker 3:

I don't (interruption) think I could I know

Speaker 2:

my house is like oh my God I wouldn't never want to (interruption) live anywhere else

Speaker 3:

I don't think I could move to a area that's so quiet man

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

(unclear) (unclear) so unbearable (interruption) I hate it when it's quiet

Speaker 2:

aye it's dead noisy (interruption) round (unclear)

Speaker 3:

around here's so like so familiar friendly noisy

Speaker 2:

I know I know

Speaker 3:

you know it's really nice I like it round here

Speaker 2:

I enjoy it here

Speaker 3:

I liked in Canning Street I had some really nice friends there they all left

Speaker 2:

they've all left haven't they

Speaker 3:

yeah

Speaker 2:

I seen what's her name this morning

Speaker 3:

who

Speaker 2:

(NAME)

Speaker 3:

did you

Speaker 2:

yeah she was in town just managed to say 'hello' to her

Speaker 3:

(unclear) all my friends right all my friends I have had right my mam's been against all of them

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

I remember (unclear) (NAME) right she was really nice right and (unclear) she's (unclear) auntie (NAME) the corner of my street she like really fashionable

Speaker 2:

I don't know

Speaker 3:

well (unclear) (unclear) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

oh yeah with the c with the curly hair

Speaker 3:

yeah

Speaker 2:

yeah

Speaker 3:

(unclear) black (unclear)

Speaker 2:

yeah

Speaker 3:

yeah her her niece (unclear) really good friend right and she left as well (unclear) every all my friends my mam's been against all of them

Speaker 2:

all of them

Speaker 3:

even you

Speaker 2:

(laughter) (unclear) even me (laughter) no I'd hate to live anywhere else man my dad was thinking of moving down ehm (pause) he was saying 'let's move down south' (pause) because that's where all the Asian people are and I gans 'no way I don't want to move down there' I'd rather stay here

Speaker 3:

well my parents was thinking of getting a shop right (unclear) they were also thinking of moving in the place

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

like I got so scared it's like (unclear) oh God I don't want to move nowhere else (unclear) I just wanted to live here

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

(unclear) all my friends are here and (unclear) school would you (interruption) like to change school

Speaker 2:

(unclear) I'd hate to change (interruption) school

Speaker 3:

I'd hate it

Speaker 2:

honestly it would be so

Speaker 3:

I know

Speaker 2:

awkward because like we know everyone like all the (interruption) teachers

Speaker 3:

you know everybody you know all the teachers and all the students everybody

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

(unclear) Newcastle's so you know (pause) it's so nice

Speaker 2:

no I mean honestly right we went to Luton right (pause) and there's loads of Asians down there and you know it just seems like Pakistan because like there's Asians all over the place

Speaker 3:

(unclear) same in Bradford

Speaker 2:

and you know at the end of the day it was seven o'clock and I just couldn't wait to get back to Newcastle I swear to God I just wanted to be home

Speaker 3:

I know even though

Speaker 2:

I hate it

Speaker 3:

even though you go to towns like Middlesbrough (unclear) more weddings there aren't there (unclear) then you can stay there for a while like I just hate it I just hate (unclear)

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

(unclear) oh God I hate living here there's so many you know

Speaker 2:

aye

Speaker 3:

so many Pakistanis (unclear) and you think oh God (unclear) I (unclear) want to go back to Newcastle

Speaker 2:

I'd like to live in a mixed place because this is mixed

Speaker 3:

aye

Speaker 2:

I mean there's n there's bit of everything you know what I mean

Speaker 3:

I know

Speaker 2:

that's why it's a laugh I love it here I'd never want to move

Speaker 3:

aye it's nice place man

Speaker 2:

(unclear) (pause) want my kids to (pause) be brought up here as well

Speaker 3:

oh I don't know I'll probably move when I grow up probably move to a different town

Speaker 2:

no I wouldn't move

Speaker 3:

probably (interruption) I'm not sure

Speaker 2:

(unclear) (unclear) (pause) (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

if you were to move what town would you move to

Speaker 2:

what town would I move to I wouldn't move I wouldn't move out of the North East I would stay in the North East move to somewhere like (pause) South Shields or North Shields I wouldn't go out I wouldn't go down south or (pause) down to Wales or (unclear)

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

couldn't bear it

Speaker 3:

oh I don't know

Speaker 2:

ay

Speaker 3:

I'll probably move down to somewhere like

Speaker 2:

somewhere down south like London why have you got many relatives down there

Speaker 3:

no I haven't got any relatives (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

all my relatives are in Middlesbrough (interruption) most of them

Speaker 3:

same here

Speaker 2:

most of them close relatives

Speaker 3:

same here

Speaker 2:

you know first cousins

Speaker 3:

Middlesbrough

Speaker 2:

are all in Middlesbrough

Speaker 3:

same here

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

oh that's one place I wouldn't want to go never ever

Speaker 2:

why

Speaker 3:

my life would be hell

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

Middlesbrough like gossiping all over the place

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

I'd like to go somewhere where there's like (pause) somewhere like Glasgow Birmingham or Manchester (unclear)

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

probably if I feel like it but I (unclear)

Speaker 2:

Manchester's just as bad as (pause) (interruption) Bradford and Luton

Speaker 3:

but I think you listening I think I'll still stick to Newcastle I don't think I'll be able to move because it's so (pause) familiar

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

like every everything you know I've lived here all my life

Speaker 2:

you're right (pause) I would move you know if I got a good job or somewhere or something like that or if I had a good reason then I would probably move but without a good reason I wouldn't move (interruption) I'd stay here

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

I'd stay here

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

I like it here

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

so what about (NAME)

Speaker 3:

what you mean

Speaker 2:

what's she doing now

Speaker 3:

she's doing her YT

Speaker 2:

would she move do you think

Speaker 3:

I don't know she doesn't (pause) she's not the type to mix in with people man

Speaker 2:

honestly

Speaker 3:

even if she does move I don't think she'll make very friends

Speaker 2:

true like

Speaker 3:

(laughter)

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

you know what she's like

Speaker 2:

yeah I know (interruption) what she's like

Speaker 3:

she's done her YT and (pause) she's getting on she's going on quite good

Speaker 2:

is she

Speaker 3:

yeah (pause) it's better than nowt isn't it

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

better than sitting in the house

Speaker 2:

aye doing nothing

Speaker 3:

no

Speaker 2:

(unclear) I want to do my A levels next year

Speaker 3:

(unclear) I want to do my A levels definitely I wish just wish (unclear)

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

parents just say yes (unclear) really wish

Speaker 2:

I would do them anyway I think they'll let us yeah they're all right about that now

Speaker 3:

do you know what your dad said did he think about it

Speaker 2:

he said I can he said I can he said I can definitely stay on and do my A levels next year

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

I don't know he might (pause) decide to take a (unclear) half way but I doubt it and I said to him it's a two year course and I'm not going to drop out if I do it I'm going to do it in the full two years

Speaker 3:

I would would definitely

Speaker 2:

definitely what one what A levels are you going to do

Speaker 3:

want I want to do business but I been talking to I've been talking to Mr (NAME) about it and (unclear) English Language

Speaker 2:

yeah my sister's doing business and Mrs (NAME) was telling us oh my God she goes 'your sister (pause) she's she's a bit of a motor mouth isn't she' because she met (NAME) (pause) and she didn't know she was my sister you know (pause) and she goes (pause) (NAME) goes when I turned round and looked at her she goes to us ehm (pause) 'talk' and my sister talked and she goes 'you remind me of someone' and my sister goes 'who d who do I remind you of' she goes 'wait a minute you're related to someone in this school aren't you' and she goes 'yeah' she goes 'you're (NAME)'s sister'

Speaker 3:

(laughter)

Speaker 2:

she goes 'yeah' and Mrs (NAME) goes 'you know (NAME) she's a bit more quieter and she doesn't use'

Speaker 3:

hands

Speaker 2:

(unclear) 'she doesn't use her hands to talk you use your hands' she's just like you know what I mean talks (unclear)

Speaker 3:

I use my hands as well

Speaker 2:

(laughter) I know she (pause) she's mad man honestly the only thing she does is just (pause) move the hands she gets it from my mam I swear to God that's what my (interruption) mum does as well

Speaker 3:

so she's going to do business

Speaker 2:

she's doing business next year business geography (pause) and I don't know something else

Speaker 3:

business (interruption) is good subject

Speaker 2:

she's definitely doing business

Speaker 3:

business is good subject

Speaker 2:

I wouldn't want to do that at A level though it's hard

Speaker 3:

why (interruption) is it

Speaker 2:

it's really hard really really hard I would do the GNVQ

Speaker 3:

do you want to do the GNVQ?

Speaker 2:

well I I wouldn't I don't want to do it but it's easier than ehm business studies A level

Speaker 3:

yeah I know but (unclear)

Speaker 2:

it's not high it's not highly recognized now

Speaker 3:

I know

Speaker 2:

not at the moment it might be in a few years' time but it's not at the moment (pause) and you know (unclear) saying that it's equivalent to two A levels (pause) to get in at university (pause) I still I'd rather have A levels

Speaker 3:

I'd rather (interruption) have A levels

Speaker 2:

because A levels (pause) (interruption) you can keep your options open

Speaker 3:

that's only equivalent that's only equivalent

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

(unclear) do English Language because I'm I'm Literature I don't find it really interesting (unclear) I think language is something that is more important than literature

Speaker 2:

I I'm good at Literature that's why I'm doing it

Speaker 3:

I want to do Language

Speaker 2:

I love English man (interruption) it's my favourite subject

Speaker 3:

use it effectively

Speaker 2:

I've always loved it

Speaker 3:

well I like (unclear) I like (unclear)

Speaker 2:

English and RE I was always English RE (pause) and ehm what was it (pause) geography I was always good at the written subjects (unclear) in all all of my years at school I've always got good grades in English (pause) in the written subjects but when it came to the mathematical subjects like maths and (interruption) science

Speaker 3:

oh yeah I'm terrible at that

Speaker 2:

I was terrible I was always at the bottom

Speaker 3:

same here (interruption) science I got a G

Speaker 2:

I was good I was good I was good up t you know until junior school

Speaker 3:

mm

Speaker 2:

I was good in junior school as soon as they introduced this new SMILE right and the cards and (interruption) everything

Speaker 3:

aye that's what I was that's what I was thinking

Speaker 2:

I just went down hill I think it en just encourages people to cheat

Speaker 3:

cheat

Speaker 2:

and not to do their work

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

because you've got the answers in the answer book

Speaker 3:

and you just (unclear) you just (unclear) oh God what

Speaker 2:

you just

Speaker 3:

you know if I don't know it just look in the answer book

Speaker 2:

just look in the answer book I know (interruption) and what is the point of that

Speaker 3:

I I think if we had algebra in our school in our school right people (unclear) concentrate more

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

the it's interesting man

Speaker 2:

even (NAME) himself you know he persuaded the teacher to let him work from books and look (NAME)'s doing really well I would rather work from a book because I would know

Speaker 3:

I hate SMILE

Speaker 2:

I've got to work through this book

Speaker 3:

I hate SMILE man

Speaker 2:

and get everything done and that way I think I'd learn better as well but the cards and everything it just makes it seem so babyish

Speaker 3:

it does it (interruption) it's just like (pause) like silly games

Speaker 2:

remember when we were younger when we were younger remember remember when we were younger in the junior school (unclear) we used to have like (interruption) books

Speaker 3:

books and you worked through them

Speaker 2:

books and worked through them and (interruption) (unclear) used to have like

Speaker 3:

(unclear) as well

Speaker 2:

a work book and a text book to work through as well

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

and I used to always do dead well and I was always ahead of everyone but as as soon as all this (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

SMILE came along I was down hill

Speaker 2:

I was down hill (pause) honestly

Speaker 3:

it's just I'm like SMILE man it's like (pause) half the things are so babyish like (pause) just like (pause) doing up jigsaws and numbers (interruption) and

Speaker 2:

I know two add two and

Speaker 3:

yeah and

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

you know (interruption) little games

Speaker 2:

when you could be concentrating on more stuff like (pause) trigonometry and ehm algebra that's what (interruption) that's what all the other

Speaker 3:

algebra is the most important part

Speaker 2:

I know that's what all the other kids in the other school are doing

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

and we're ca we're doing silly cards

Speaker 3:

I'm I'm

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

a bit scared about business doing business A levels because you know if it's bit too hard I wouldn't wouldn't talk to Mr (NAME) about it

Speaker 2:

you well you can you can have your t y you get you do get about two months' trial don't you then if you don't like it you can change or you can drop out (pause) I'm not doing three A levels I couldn't cope with three

Speaker 3:

oh I'm going to do two A levels and I want to (interruption) do photography

Speaker 2:

I'm only doing two

Speaker 3:

I want to do a photography course

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

I want a photography course at least for the one year

Speaker 2:

where's that

Speaker 3:

I think at school Mr (NAME) doing it next year

Speaker 2:

photography in one year

Speaker 3:

yeah

Speaker 2:

I might do that like

Speaker 3:

I want to do photography

Speaker 2:

I'm always interested in like (interruption) taking photos (unclear)

Speaker 3:

it's so it's so good isn't it

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

I want to do photography (NAME)'s doing it as well

Speaker 2:

mm (interruption) honestly

Speaker 3:

(NAME) says it's good because she done it last year

Speaker 2:

you see our photos the ones that we took (pause) for the fashion show

Speaker 3:

oh yeah (interruption) they were good

Speaker 2:

oh they were really good honestly they were (interruption) really really good

Speaker 3:

I want to do photography next year

Speaker 2:

mm (pause) so what else

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

what else are you thinking of doing

Speaker 3:

eh

Speaker 2:

what else are you thinking of doing what are you thinking of doing after A levels are you going to get a job or what (interruption) go to university

Speaker 3:

I wish I could (unclear) I wish I could think (unclear) don't know because sometimes I think that after A levels that'll be the end to it

Speaker 2:

mm get married

Speaker 3:

(laughter) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

so scared man (unclear) (pause) after A levels right I want to go I want I want to get a degree want to get a degree in business

Speaker 2:

well then if you want to get a degree in business I would go ahead and do the GNVQ three because that isn't specific business and if you want to do a degree in business well that'll get you in (pause) the GNVQ three can get you in

Speaker 3:

yeah (unclear) it's you're right because it's not recommended as much and it's only equivalent it's not as if it's classed as two A levels it's (unclear) only equivalent

Speaker 2:

yeah (unclear)

Speaker 3:

and do you know something I I get the feeling it's just like (pause) it's like (pause) it's like

Speaker 2:

I don't know

Speaker 3:

(unclear) much work

Speaker 2:

honestly

Speaker 3:

it is a lot of work but

Speaker 2:

you know just like A levels when someone just says A levels I can just imagine doing loads and loads of work and when they say GNVQ I can just imagine messing (interruption) around

Speaker 3:

nothing just (interruption) messing around

Speaker 2:

(unclear) that's why I want to (interruption) do the A levels

Speaker 3:

I don't want to do a GNVQ

Speaker 2:

I want to just put my head down and get some work done work hard for two years and get two decent grades honestly and then I'm going to see (pause) what I want after that (unclear)

Speaker 3:

I don't want GNVQ honestly because y you know just the sound of it makes you think oh God it's just (unclear) messing around like this year

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

but we didn't mess around we got all our work (unclear) it was a laugh this year it was a laugh

Speaker 2:

yeah (pause) it was

Speaker 3:

I remem I'd never forget this year

Speaker 2:

this year was brilliant honestly

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

God I wish they would all come back you know it's going to be dead empty without them all next year

Speaker 3:

already is

Speaker 2:

me and you are going to be the only ones here

Speaker 3:

already is empty

Speaker 2:

me and you and (NAME) that's it we had some right good laughs I swear to God

Speaker 3:

aye remember when we used to stay in that room and play cards at dinner time

Speaker 2:

and the town we used to go to the town all the time when we went (interruption) to the job centre (laughter)

Speaker 3:

oh oh aye I'll never forget that

Speaker 2:

and his auntie walked in (NAME)'s auntie walked in oh God

Speaker 3:

oh man I think I'm really going to miss em next year (unclear) leave

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

have you heard from (NAME)

Speaker 3:

have I heard I'm going to kill him I'm (unclear) going to murder him

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

I am I'm really going to kill him when he comes back

Speaker 2:

I wonder what he's going to do next year

Speaker 3:

he's going to college

Speaker 2:

(unclear) have you I thought yous were going to get that shop in Dunston (pause) did you not get it

Speaker 3:

no

Speaker 2:

what's (NAME) doing next year

Speaker 3:

I divn't know I think he's I think he's going to stay on

Speaker 2:

is he fifth year now or is he fourth year

Speaker 3:

he's fourth year I think he's going to carry on with education and (NAME) going to ehm college next year I think

Speaker 2:

is she

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

what's she going to do at college

Speaker 3:

nursery nurse nursery course

Speaker 2:

nursery nursing

Speaker 3:

(interruption) I don't want to go to college

Speaker 2:

is that at Rye Hill

Speaker 3:

yeah I don't want to go to college

Speaker 2:

why

Speaker 3:

I don't know why (unclear)

Speaker 2:

mm (pause) I just don't want to leave (unclear) we're dead lucky you know we've got sixth form in school in other cities they don't

Speaker 3:

I know

Speaker 2:

and like in Middlesbrough you've got to go to a sixth form college and most of the parents don't even let the girls go

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

because like it's different from school you're going to a college

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

but here we've got like sixth form in the school (pause) (interruption) so

Speaker 3:

yeah (unclear) I think it's better here (unclear)

Speaker 2:

it's better I know

Speaker 3:

(NAME)'s coming back next year

Speaker 2:

is he

Speaker 3:

yeah (NAME) was here yesterday oh yesterday was so boring (unclear) sitting all day right and he was sitting there going 'oh why do you always criticize me' I goes 'what did I say to you' he goes 'you're always sitting there you know like (unclear) swearing to me' I says 'okay then I won't swear to you' he says 'well w why do you bother (unclear) I'm not going to swear to you and I'm not going to talk to you' like sat there silently for ten minutes right like after ten minutes he goes 'oh here man test me with this I've got a driving lesson coming up' (laughter)

Speaker 2:

oh

Speaker 3:

I felt like saying 'oh I thought you said don't talk to me' he goes 'oh forget it man just test me will you'

Speaker 2:

my dad has been learning how to drive for (pause) one (pause) one and a half years and he still hasn't give his test I mean (interruption) he came

Speaker 3:

one and a half years

Speaker 2:

he came to this country in nineteen seventy six and he still hasn't learned how to drive even

Speaker 3:

that's (unclear)

Speaker 2:

he learns how to drive now I goes to my dad I goes 'well why didn't you learn then' you know 'you should have learnt then when it was the time when you were young and this year you could have had a car and you could have been having a good time' and you know what he said he goes (unclear) 'in them days nobody used to have cars nobody used to drive' you know what I mean

Speaker 3:

they did

Speaker 2:

they've just started buying cars now well cars have (interruption) gone really popular

Speaker 3:

is he going for his test

Speaker 2:

no he's going to Pakistan in two weeks time so he's give up his lessons as well when he comes back he says he going to (pause) start taking lessons again and then give a test

Speaker 3:

when's he come back

Speaker 2:

he's going for about seven weeks

Speaker 3:

so that means he's going (unclear) back until we go back come back to school

Speaker 2:

yeah through the holidays he'll be back (pause) it'll be holidays when he comes back but isn't he mad I mean he's been in this country for twenty years and he learns how to drive now (pause) (interruption) he's mad

Speaker 3:

thought you said he came in seventy six

Speaker 2:

well (pause) no man he's been here (pause) right he first of all he came when he was about eleven with his dad my granddad he brought my dad and (unclear) my uncle that was when they were y very young and then m (unclear) stayed because he was married and he stayed here with his wife and his kids and my dad and my granddad went back to Pakistan and then my dad he came back and then he s used to stay with his brother in Leeds and they used to work there and then he went over and got married to my mum and then he came back over here and I was born then he got my mum's and my visa then we came here as well and we used to live in Sidney Grove (pause) I remember all three all three families there was me our family my dad and my mum and me and there was my dad's sister her husband and her two kids you know (unclear)

Speaker 3:

yeah (unclear)

Speaker 2:

(unclear) yeah and there was you know ehm r (NAME) and them their family was (pause) in them days there was only (NAME) (NAME) (pause) and the mam and dad and we used to all live in one big house I swear to God (unclear)

Speaker 3:

big house was it really big

Speaker 2:

on Sidney Grove yeah well it wasn't that big had about four bedrooms and we used to live there and honestly they were so horrible to us I used to hate it they used to lock me and my mum in the top bedrooms and like we weren't allowed to (interruption) come down or anything

Speaker 3:

I hate relatives

Speaker 2:

we used to get everything upstairs

Speaker 3:

I hate relatives (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

and then my dad he wanted to separate so we bought our own place and then we moved out and then the the whole families both families came and asked my mam and dad for forgiveness you know that they were really sorry about everything that happened

Speaker 3:

aye they should

Speaker 2:

and we we still get we still didn't get a share of the house either because my dad he was the one that paid for it as well all three of them paid for the house they had the mortgage (pause) all three names (pause) and that house now is occupied by my dad's sister and her husband that's w you know the house they're living in (unclear) Sidney Grove that is our house (pause) it was bought by all three of us and they

Speaker 3:

that's your house (unclear) your relatives (unclear) evicted you

Speaker 2:

in the end they're the ones that kept it and then we moved out and (interruption) moved there

Speaker 3:

telling you man relatives are dead you know that's so (pause) they like they will use you

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

just for silly reasons

Speaker 2:

and then we moved out yeah and then we've been living in Wingrove Avenue (pause) ever since (pause) (interruption) since (unclear)

Speaker 3:

(unclear) ever thought of moving out

Speaker 2:

no as I said I love it I would hate to move out

Speaker 3:

no I mean no I mean getting another house in Fenham

Speaker 2:

(unclear) I d I doubt it I'd rather just stay where we are

Speaker 3:

what happened to Fenham Hall Drive I mean (unclear)

Speaker 2:

Wingrove Road you mean

Speaker 3:

no what happened to ehm Milvain Avenue house

Speaker 2:

we didn't buy it I told you there was something wrong with it (interruption) it was like

Speaker 3:

(unclear) nicest house

Speaker 2:

it was a beautiful house but there was an old woman who'd actually died in the house

Speaker 3:

that's what spoils (unclear)

Speaker 2:

that's what spoilt it my mam and dad really freaked out when they found out that the woman had actually died in the house and my mam goes 'no we won't buy it'

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

and plus the other thing about it was (pause) right there was two rooms there was a living room and there was a front room

Speaker 3:

(unclear) (interruption) both into one

Speaker 2:

but (pause) there wasn't a door there wasn't a door which led straight

Speaker 3:

two rooms into one

Speaker 2:

you like had to walk through the living room to go into the front room and that's a disadvantage because like (pause) if you've got a separate door in the passage way which leads into the front room that is a lot better so that lost the value of the house as well and plus it was forty five thousand (pause) mam and dad said (pause) (unclear) the people who who owned the house said they wouldn't drop the price and like it would've cost us a lot if we were going to get a door put in and everything and plus the woman that had died in the house so my mum and dad didn't buy it

Speaker 3:

mm that's what that's what spoils it (interruption) man

Speaker 2:

then we just forgot about it honestly (interruption) we're just happy where we are man

Speaker 3:

so many nice house (unclear)

Speaker 2:

I don't know we've got the flat upstairs and we rent it to the ol w we rent it out and that is really beautiful honestly four bedrooms upstairs because it's got an attic as well and the woman's been living there for forty years and we can't get her out

Speaker 3:

(laughter)

Speaker 2:

she's been a tenant for forty years my dad's only o owned the property for about fifteen years (interruption) fifteen fourteen years

Speaker 3:

so she's been living there before five years

Speaker 2:

she she ay

Speaker 3:

she been living there for five years before yous moved in

Speaker 2:

yeah before even we moved in when it was owned by (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

God how old is she

Speaker 2:

she's here man she had to k right her her husband and her mother in law used to h own the well rent the flat before her then sh when she got married (pause) (interruption) to her husband

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

they b they both stayed in the house she had both her kids there her husband has died in that flat (pause) you know (pause) and her kids (unclear) her daughter's married and she's gone away and her and her son are still living there and we can't get her out (pause) you know sh like (interruption) she's just

Speaker 3:

(unclear) terrible

Speaker 2:

she's like a f she (interruption) just won't move out

Speaker 3:

(unclear) about sixty (interruption) she's about sixty

Speaker 2:

sh she's a pensioner yeah and she's got a son (unclear) that lives with her as well and she just won't move out she's been living there for forty years and we can't get her out

Speaker 3:

no she's a permanent (unclear) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

I know (unclear) never going to get her out and that loses the value of the whole property because if we sell the flat we've got to sell them both together

Speaker 3:

and she (interruption) if she won't (unclear)

Speaker 2:

and no one's going to buy it and plus she doesn't pay that much rent either because she's an old tenant

Speaker 3:

charming

Speaker 2:

so that's that that's that makes things even worse (pause) so my mam my mam and dad were thinking of moving (pause) but like out of Fenham and I don't want to move out of Fenham (pause) because like school's here and plus I want to finish my education and then then when I finish my education then they can think of moving elsewhere (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

(unclear) moved to a different school now

Speaker 2:

you can't you can't if you start your A levels you've got to stay here and plus I like it here I don't want to move

Speaker 3:

mm this bit's nice

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

even though it's getting change (unclear) next year

Speaker 2:

I know I showed her the mug yesterday (pause) she goes 'it's really really nice'

Speaker 3:

(unclear) 'Westgate Hill Community College' (unclear) sick

Speaker 2:

'Westgate Community County College'

Speaker 3:

sounds sick

Speaker 2:

sounds it (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

why can't they (unclear) like (pause) 'West High School' or something

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

rather than 'Westgate'

Speaker 2:

community college

Speaker 3:

Westgate is (interruption) probably the most

Speaker 2:

the Westgate spoils it it's Westgate is the worst area in

Speaker 3:

aye

Speaker 2:

Newcastle like Elswick and that (unclear)

Speaker 3:

it's counted as the most (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

I know and then Westgate County College that makes Rutherford like makes our school bad as well because people'll arrive and oh we don't want to go there

Speaker 3:

it's a bit stupid as well calling it college when you've got first years up to sixth formers here

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

college is where you only have like (pause) from sixteen to (pause) upper ages

Speaker 2:

I know (pause) higher ages I divn't know it's all right they've got ac (NAME) and them got an activity day on Friday

Speaker 3:

have they

Speaker 2:

yeah

Speaker 3:

oh I remember when we used (interruption) to have that

Speaker 2:

they're doing Asian dancing

Speaker 3:

are they

Speaker 2:

Asian dancing honestly

Speaker 3:

oh that must be good fancy joining them

Speaker 2:

we can't

Speaker 3:

oh God

Speaker 2:

we can't we're not allowed

Speaker 3:

do you think we'll have a leaving leaving party sometime

Speaker 2:

I doubt it

Speaker 3:

I know

Speaker 2:

I really doubt it

Speaker 3:

remember the Christmas disco

Speaker 2:

how could I forget

Speaker 3:

oh it was cool

Speaker 2:

did (NAME) bring the photos in

Speaker 3:

did she hell she hasn't even been in neither has (NAME)

Speaker 2:

honestly

Speaker 3:

honestly I phoned her right and she goes to me 'I bet you I'll be in on Wednesday' right and I goes 'okay bet you a tenner' right and she didn't come in I going to kill her honestly I'm going to murder that girl

Speaker 2:

mm yeah

Speaker 3:

(unclear) birthday (unclear) kill her

Speaker 2:

whose

Speaker 3:

(NAME)'s on Tuesday

Speaker 2:

is it

Speaker 3:

yeah I goes to (NAME) 'I'll get her perfume' she goes 'don't get perfume because she buys them all the time'

Speaker 2:

oh

Speaker 3:

(unclear) you know (unclear) jewellery shop

Speaker 2:

aye

Speaker 3:

I might come down with you and see if they've got any nice (interruption) necklaces or chains

Speaker 2:

I'm going down (pause) straight after yeah

Speaker 3:

aye might go down jewellery shop and get her something nice

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

on Tuesday

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

so (pause) (unclear) two days left

Speaker 2:

mm how old's your younger sister

Speaker 3:

whose

Speaker 2:

yours

Speaker 3:

mine she's five

Speaker 2:

when's it her birthday

Speaker 3:

her birthday's been hers was twenty fourth February

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

yours is Christmas Day (laughter)

Speaker 2:

eh

Speaker 3:

(interruption) yours is Christmas Day

Speaker 2:

and mine's on Christmas Day oh people say I'm dead lucky no most people say I'm dead unlucky

Speaker 3:

why

Speaker 2:

for having my birthday on Christmas Day they say you get less presents (laughter)

Speaker 3:

oh God (laughter)

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

but we don't get presents anyway do we

Speaker 2:

I know do you want to know something I think my date of birth has been muddled up you know I'm sure I wasn't born on that date (pause) I couldn't have been man my mum goes because I was born in Pakistan

Speaker 3:

yeah that that is what (interruption) happens

Speaker 2:

I think they muddled it up you know honestly (pause) it's i it it can't be the twenty fifth my mum goes 'I definitely remember that you were born on either the sixteenth or the eighteenth (pause) of December' that's what my mum remembered but you know on my birth certificate (pause) they've got written down ehm the (interruption) twenty fifth

Speaker 3:

twenty fifth

Speaker 2:

so that is that is what's been (pause) going wrong ever since and my name as well the amount of times that my name's changed in Newcastle my God (pause) it was

Speaker 3:

your real name's (NAME) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

my na r my name that I get called in the house right is (NAME) (NAME) that is my proper name (pause) and (pause) then at school I get called (NAME) (pause) and when I was in infants it was (NAME) B when I moved to the juniors it was (NAME) (NAME) now it's (NAME) (NAME) but still I get letters from like you know (pause) from child benefit and that who pay us money (pause) you know

Speaker 3:

yeah

Speaker 2:

child benefit and they've got me down as (NAME) (pause) and they don't know who I am you know who the hell (NAME) is (interruption) so

Speaker 3:

that (unclear) changed your name even when you done your passport didn't you

Speaker 2:

yeah and on my passport

Speaker 3:

same happened to (NAME)

Speaker 2:

that was the worst thing that happened on the passport I s applied f because my date had ran out and I applied again and (pause) well I use I always use my name as (NAME) (NAME) I never use B (NAME) B

Speaker 3:

I think that's stupid

Speaker 2:

and ehm (pause) when I applied again I on the form I wrote (NAME) (NAME) and then then a letter came through the door saying (pause) 'oh have you changed your name by deed poll or what' you know there was just they were going on in the letter (pause) and I goes 'well this this is (interruption) my name'

Speaker 3:

they probably thought (unclear) illegal immigrant

Speaker 2:

this is I know that's what they they probably thought but then I got like documents I got a letter from school and I got a letter from the doctor's and all that and sent it away and then I got my passport they caused me so much hassle honestly I didn't get my passport for about four months

Speaker 3:

stupid (unclear)

Speaker 2:

they took ages (pause) honestly

Speaker 3:

God I'm telling you the school's dead

Speaker 2:

dead empty

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

everyone's gone

Speaker 3:

everyone's gone

Speaker 3:

miss them next year I'm really going to miss them next year

Speaker 2:

mm (unclear) (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

it's not going to be it's not going to be like (pause) this year next year's going to be totally different can (interruption) just imagine it

Speaker 2:

mm-hm (pause) (unclear) (pause) what was the best thing that you did when you were young

Speaker 3:

what was the best thing I did when I was young (unclear) (interruption) probably going (unclear) moors

Speaker 2:

I think when I was a child it was much better (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

probably going down the town moor

Speaker 2:

oh aye to the Hoppings

Speaker 3:

aye (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

with your mam and dad

Speaker 3:

aye

Speaker 2:

eeh my mum and dad never ever used to let me go on the high rides you know my dad used to always put us on the round about when I was (interruption) about ten

Speaker 3:

(unclear) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

he used to say 'go on the round about' and wave at us you know he used to

Speaker 3:

aye and the horses (interruption) the merry go round

Speaker 2:

and p and and ring the bells

Speaker 3:

they're stupid

Speaker 2:

oh honestly I my mam and dad just treated me like (pause) a baby

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

until I was about nine ten I was still classed as a baby at the age of nine or ten they used to

Speaker 3:

it's horrible when you're the age of sixteen and especially when you're Asian as well

Speaker 2:

(unclear) I'd rather be young again

Speaker 3:

I'd rather be (unclear) a little kid

Speaker 2:

honestly my brother has got it so different my brother you know he's only (pause) he's ten now and ehm his life is so different compared to mine when I was ten

Speaker 3:

I know my little sister she gets treated like a (pause) princess she gets everything she wants even at her age I didn't get the things that she she's got now

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

like you know I always wanted a ring right and I was small right I never got one (unclear) and my little sister you know (pause) the five year old right (unclear) got her a ring and she's only she was only four when she got a bloody ring she gets everything she wants she's so lucky

Speaker 2:

honestly I know my us as well I think out of all of us my brother has got to be the luckiest when I was younger it was like (pause) I don't know I did get what I wanted but like (pause) I never asked for the kind of things that my sister and my brother asked for

Speaker 3:

same here I never asked for like (pause) toys or nothing because

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

only I can remember right only toy I had when I was small was this doll that talked

Speaker 2:

just one (interruption) doll

Speaker 3:

one one doll only

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

that was the only toy I got (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

my favourite toy when I was young right had got to be there's this this massive big right (pause) pink teddy bear (interruption) it was abso

Speaker 3:

you used to have a koala bear didn't you

Speaker 2:

do you remember that

Speaker 3:

yeah (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

oh my God I've still got it (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

(laughter) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

and when you when you shake it

Speaker 3:

(laughter) yeah

Speaker 2:

it rings oh I've still got that bear honestly I wouldn't I would never throw that bear away I used

Speaker 3:

I remember that bear

Speaker 2:

I just love them two bears they're my favourite bears do you know when I feel sad (pause) I just go and cuddle them I swear to God (interruption) I've still got

Speaker 3:

I remember the koala

Speaker 2:

the koala when you shake it

Speaker 3:

yeah (laughter)

Speaker 2:

he rings I know I've still got that honestly I got that when I was about three or four

Speaker 3:

I've still got the doll I've g I I got that when I was about (pause) I don't know I was about six

Speaker 2:

I know but now honestly kids aren't interested in dolls and that

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

but all they're interested in now is like (pause) computer games and all this it's totally (interruption) different

Speaker 3:

I don't find them that (pause) interesting

Speaker 2:

I hate them (unclear)

Speaker 3:

I hate them

Speaker 2:

I d I d I don't even understand them (interruption) I don't even know what to do on them

Speaker 3:

when I was small (pause) when I was small I liked like Barbie dolls and (interruption) Cindy dolls

Speaker 2:

Barbie dolls and (interruption) Cindy dolls

Speaker 3:

but I never got them

Speaker 2:

and me neither (interruption) I never got them

Speaker 3:

I never got them

Speaker 2:

and you know at the fair ground you know them beautiful dolls

Speaker 3:

aye

Speaker 2:

that they used to have with the lovely dresses

Speaker 3:

my sister my s little sister got them when I was I was small I didn't get them

Speaker 2:

I didn't get them I (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

my little sister got one

Speaker 2:

I never got one (interruption) honestly

Speaker 3:

I know it's a it's a it's a dress that it's up (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

the dress I mean there's I don't even think that doll that doll has got legs underneath you know it's just like that dress

Speaker 3:

it's just a (interruption) dress

Speaker 2:

and with the head of a doll

Speaker 3:

I know

Speaker 2:

but it was just beautiful just looking at them I still remember I used to always say 'I want one of them' but I never (interruption) got one

Speaker 3:

never got one (interruption) same here

Speaker 2:

and my brother well he doesn't ask for dolls you know what I mean but he gets what he wants (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

same with my little sister she gets all she even gets things that she doesn't even like doesn't even

Speaker 2:

need

Speaker 3:

yeah

Speaker 2:

I know and when we were younger it was always you know you only got a pair of shoes when you needed one you never got like a (interruption) spare pair

Speaker 3:

no I got I got spare pairs but (pause) I don't know

Speaker 2:

I divn't know I just

Speaker 3:

I wish I (unclear) kid again

Speaker 2:

so do I

Speaker 3:

I'm telling you

Speaker 2:

I wish I was a kid now though

Speaker 3:

(laughter) oh I know (laughter)

Speaker 2:

I think it's better now I'd get everything I wanted

Speaker 3:

(unclear) fancied when we were when we were kids I fancied (unclear)

Speaker 2:

oh it was good

Speaker 3:

(unclear) because it was the middle ages you know (laughter)

Speaker 2:

honestly you should see some of my photos when I was younger and you know that flares are back in fashion now

Speaker 3:

yeah

Speaker 2:

you know flares and (interruption) bell bottoms

Speaker 3:

I had I had one of them as well

Speaker 2:

and I had bell bottoms on and when I was little (unclear) there's a photograph of me my mum and you know (NAME) mum right she's picking me up on the photo right and I've got orange flares on and honestly (pause) it just bring back old memories I wish I was young again honestly

Speaker 3:

I know

Speaker 2:

and my mum always my mum's always telling us that 'oh you used to have so many clothes you know that I just didn't know' (pause) (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

have you got any photos of your childhood like

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

when you were (unclear) baby

Speaker 2:

I've got one photo of me when I was a baby

Speaker 3:

I haven't even got any

Speaker 2:

it's beautiful it's black and white me and my step sister

Speaker 3:

(unclear) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

it is absolutely gorgeous it was taken in Pakistan but it is absolutely gorgeous

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

and I'm about that high right and I've got a baldy head

Speaker 3:

baldy

Speaker 2:

no hair on my head honestly nothing (laughter)

Speaker 3:

God

Speaker 2:

and you know if you look at that photo you think it's a boy

Speaker 3:

oh my God

Speaker 2:

but I was I was a beautiful baby

Speaker 3:

the photo I've got of me the I'm the youngest it's got to be about (pause) I must have been about four

Speaker 2:

four

Speaker 3:

I wish I had a ph I wish I had a photo when I was a baby I want to look at myself when I'm about (interruption) one or two

Speaker 2:

(unclear) I know my mum and dad have no I have the photo that I've got of of me's was when I was about one (pause) and you know the other thing about me when I was younger right and I came back from Pakistan you never guess I had orange hair

Speaker 3:

aye

Speaker 2:

(unclear) pale skin and blue eyes I couldn't believe it

Speaker 3:

blue eyes

Speaker 2:

blue eyes (unclear) you know like greeny blue and my mum goes that you know (NAME)'s mum (NAME) mum she used to always they used to do markets and she used to always take me down with her right and you know all the English people used to come up and say 'that kid is not Asian that is an English kid what is she doing with yous' you know

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

and she used to say 'no no (interruption) she's Asian she's Asian'

Speaker 3:

the sun (unclear) your hair (unclear)

Speaker 2:

because the sun there it had just bleached my hair but gradually as I grew older my hair turned black my eyes turned brown and my skin (interruption) just went normal

Speaker 3:

(unclear) blue eyes so beautiful man

Speaker 2:

but I honestly I despise my mum you know I goes 'why did you used to' you know because she used to she goes that you know everybody like make takes the mickey out of Asian (pause) Asian kids that've got blue eyes

Speaker 3:

true that is true

Speaker 2:

and they call them billi billi so my mum goes she started putting surma in my eyes so that the colour of my eyes t you know pupils would change and it did it changed to brown but still if you look it's like a light brown

Speaker 3:

yeah it is

Speaker 2:

it's really light

Speaker 3:

it's really light

Speaker 2:

and before my eyes were like a greeny blue (interruption) honestly

Speaker 3:

oh

Speaker 2:

beautiful and I and I and I goes to her (unclear) 'why did you do it I'd rather have blue eyes'

Speaker 3:

I know so would I

Speaker 2:

'and be and be different to everyone else' but honestly that's what my mum said that I had (pause) (unclear) you know brown hair light light brown hair (unclear) pale skin and blue eyes and she used to go 'no one used to believe that you were (pause) an Asian child' you w they were all saying you know 'she's not Asian'

Speaker 3:

my little sister

Speaker 2:

what's she doing with you (interruption) 'she's not Asian'

Speaker 3:

my little sister when she was born right she like (unclear) about a few months right she like (pause) big fat chubby cheeks right and she had dark blue eyes like you could tell the colour of her eyes they were dark blue

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

but the colour gradually changes doesn't it when you're small

Speaker 2:

my brother's dead light as well f for an Asian he's dead light like look have you seen the photo he's out of all of us he's the lightest (pause) (interruption) out of all of us

Speaker 3:

(unclear) the lightest in my family

Speaker 2:

all I I'm dark dark like dark skinned my sister's she's all right

Speaker 3:

she's fair

Speaker 2:

she's all right she's not that dark but my little brother he's really fair he's really like got really light skin but me the sun comes out for five minutes and (interruption) honestly

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

I I go dead dead dark

Speaker 3:

aye

Speaker 2:

I feel as if I

Speaker 3:

it's just the way you feel it as well

Speaker 2:

I know I can feel the oh God

Speaker 3:

mm

Speaker 2:

I'm getting dark you just go red you (interruption) I've always noticed that with you

Speaker 3:

oh I go bright red me (interruption) honestly

Speaker 2:

even when you were little you I remember w we used to all take the mick out of you because you used to go bright red

Speaker 3:

(laughter)

Speaker 2:

you and ehm what's her name as well (pause) you know sh (NAME)

Speaker 3:

yeah

Speaker 2:

(NAME) and (NAME) she used to go red

Speaker 3:

I go red I (unclear) go red (unclear) stupid things

Speaker 2:

did you see me when I went red yesterday I just went bright red

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

as red as my apple remember (laughter) bright red

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

I had a red apple and honestly my the red apple and my (interruption) face just looked (pause) identical (laughter)

Speaker 3:

(unclear) I hate it when you go red

Speaker 2:

(unclear) it's dead embarrassing

Speaker 3:

but some people right th you know when they go red you can like spot it on their face you go you think 'oh my God'

Speaker 2:

(NAME) (NAME)'s one of them (interruption) (NAME)

Speaker 3:

he's he's he's (interruption) he's just natural he's naturally red he's got red cheeks

Speaker 2:

I think he just naturally red he's got red cheeks honestly oh (unclear) where is (NAME) today

Speaker 3:

he's n he hasn't been in for

Speaker 2:

none of them have been in

Speaker 3:

I know since his birthday I can remember on his birthday right few weeks back I says to him 'where where's all your friends' (unclear) 'oh they're not here' (unclear) I felt dead sorry for him because none of his friends were here

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

he was like he was like by himself

Speaker 2:

oh

Speaker 3:

(NAME)'s sweet man

Speaker 2:

(NAME)'s always been sweet man I remember when we were (interruption) in first year

Speaker 3:

I remember him last year

Speaker 2:

in the first year right when we started this school right (pause) (NAME) (NAME) (NAME) (NAME) (NAME) I think they must have been the nicest boys in the whole of the first year they were (interruption) so nice

Speaker 3:

tell you who were the most immature boys in my class it had to be (NAME) (NAME) (interruption) and look at him now

Speaker 2:

and now he's changed so much

Speaker 3:

he's he's like he's just like (unclear) couldn't believe it

Speaker 2:

(unclear) he's a totally (interruption) different (NAME)

Speaker 3:

the other day the other day we were coming from we were coming from English right and there was me (NAME) and him right he puts his a arm round me he goes 'oh me and (NAME) are from me me and (NAME) are best pals from last year' I felt like saying 'my God is that the same (NAME) I used to know'

Speaker 2:

he's changed so much honestly and chubby (NAME) remember he was so fat

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

and now he's just like he

Speaker 3:

he's lost weight

Speaker 2:

he he's just gone thinner and taller

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

he's just like he's (pause) well I (interruption) don't know what's happened to him

Speaker 3:

do you remember the twins (NAME) and (NAME)

Speaker 2:

what happened to them

Speaker 3:

I don't know

Speaker 2:

I don't know I never see them now (interruption) I've never seen them for ages

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

I know and me the the only people who I remember from my childhood (pause) now (pause) (NAME) (NAME) (NAME) that's just had the interview him I used to go to infant school with him and nursery with him

Speaker 3:

I used to go to I used to go to infant school (unclear) (NAME) (NAME)

Speaker 2:

honestly

Speaker 3:

yeah (unclear) (NAME) bow we used to I'll tell you (unclear) (NAME) (NAME) (NAME) (NAME) (pause) (NAME) (NAME)

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

(NAME) (pause) and (NAME) (pause) that's it I think

Speaker 2:

there's loads of (pause) us it was

Speaker 3:

(NAME) (interruption) do you remember (NAME)

Speaker 2:

(NAME) yeah oh she was nice (interruption) I liked (NAME)

Speaker 3:

she was sweet her

Speaker 2:

out of us right it was me there was (NAME) there was (NAME) (NAME) (pause) there was (NAME) and (NAME) the twins (NAME) (NAME) (NAME) (NAME) (pause) (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

(unclear) all of yous were just like

Speaker 2:

all of us were like in the same class we've been we we were together since (pause) since nursery I remember since nursery we were together then we went to the same infant school same junior school and then we all came to Rutherford

Speaker 3:

well us lot right we were we were (pause) from infants from first year infants to Rutherford (pause) like you know like

Speaker 2:

yeah

Speaker 3:

been in contact

Speaker 2:

yeah

Speaker 3:

(NAME) (NAME) (NAME) (NAME) (NAME) and (NAME) (NAME) (interruption) he (unclear) cried all the time

Speaker 2:

honestly I I still remember you know when we were little right and we used to there was this nursery it was like a church (pause) but like I don't know the it was either play school or something for half day or something from morning till twelve and there used to be me and (NAME) (NAME) I still remember (NAME) (NAME) and me we used to always play together right you know with the with the s with the s (interruption) you know that thing

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

(unclear) you know like it's like a flower but you can make it into all different kind of little things and we used to play with that but honestly I used to you know when the t when my mum used to take right I didn't used to want to leave her right I used to say 'well don't go' you know 'stay here'

Speaker 3:

oh

Speaker 2:

because I used to think she's going to leave me and (interruption) never ever come back

Speaker 3:

my first experience when I came to scho when I went to school first day it was horrible (unclear) embarrassing (unclear) well now I remember it's embarrassing right but I was small (unclear) five right and she dropped me off (unclear) school right and (unclear) my first day and my mum goes 'okay you stay here and I'm going' and I can remember I was screaming like (interruption) anything

Speaker 2:

me as well you know the church right (interruption) it was like on the corner of the road

Speaker 3:

(unclear) yeah

Speaker 2:

right the church was on the corner of the road and where we used to play right there was a big window and when my mum used to cross the road to go home (interruption) you could see

Speaker 3:

you could see it

Speaker 2:

and my mum goes 'well I'm just going round the corner to get you a like (pause) a bike'

Speaker 3:

aye

Speaker 2:

'so you can climb on it' and she'd gone home and I was playing with (NAME) (NAME) and I seen my mam crossing the road and

Speaker 3:

you started screaming

Speaker 2:

(unclear) going home and I started screaming I goes 'my mum's gone home I want to go home with her' and I remember the women were so nice honestly they used to pick you up and you know just comfort you all the time and that woman who was my nursery teacher I still see her

Speaker 3:

do you

Speaker 2:

and she doesn't know who I am but I can still remember her she was quite a big woman right (pause) quite chubby and she wears round spectacles she's even got a dau daughter who comes to school called (NAME) I know that and honestly she doesn't know but I can remember her picking me up when I was younger I just you know

Speaker 3:

if I get if I get reminded about that get so embarrassed (unclear) I can just (pause) I can remember it man when I was like screaming I was 'no I'm not staying here I want to go home with my mam'

Speaker 2:

I know I know it was just like

Speaker 3:

(unclear) embarrassing

Speaker 2:

she's going to leave me and never ever come back again and my brother and my sister (pause) (interruption) they

Speaker 3:

my sister didn't even (unclear)

Speaker 2:

they didn't even care my mum could leave them anywhere and they just wouldn't cry

Speaker 3:

I know

Speaker 2:

but me I think it's because I'm the first child

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

that's what my mum says 'because you're the first and that's why you're' (pause) I don't know if my mum and dad (interruption) are feeling pain

Speaker 3:

I didn't go to nursery

Speaker 2:

I know I'm I'm just dead close to them more close to them (pause) than my brother and my sister and my mum honestly when she left me that day (pause) I I thought I was going to die honestly

Speaker 3:

did you go to nursery

Speaker 2:

yeah I did I went (interruption) to nursery

Speaker 3:

I didn't I went to school straight to school

Speaker 2:

I went to nursery

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

and then I went and and oh the other thing that I remember most was on the first Christmas party that we had at the nursery school right

Speaker 3:

Santa Claus

Speaker 2:

and Santa Claus came and I still remember what he gave me right it was a great big box right and it was like a l you know little ehm (pause) tea cups and saucers and he gave me a great big set of those and it had everything and I just loved it honestly

Speaker 3:

(unclear) Christmas time (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

I've still got odd things you know from that set (unclear) you know

Speaker 3:

aye

Speaker 2:

that if I just find them lying about and (pause) I can't believe it I've still got them

Speaker 3:

I remember years back when san when Santa Claus used to come right and like y (pause) you know the the season (unclear) changed didn't it

Speaker 2:

yeah

Speaker 3:

it'd be dark at night right

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

and when he used to when he used to come (unclear) give me this doll right (unclear) press (unclear) the tummy (unclear) used to squeak

Speaker 2:

right

Speaker 3:

it was so sweet man

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

oh I really liked it when Santa Claus used to come used to be (interruption) really nice

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

but (unclear) Santa c y you couldn't go and see Santa Claus when you were about (pause) in the (pause) (interruption) third year

Speaker 2:

they (unclear) the infants that was it (unclear) once you were in the juniors that was it

Speaker 3:

that was it you couldn't

Speaker 2:

(unclear) you know as we got older right we used to know and we used to always tell the younger kids 'it's not really Santa Claus it's just the caretaker who's dressed up as Santa Claus'

Speaker 3:

I used to really think it was (interruption) Santa Claus I used to believe in it

Speaker 2:

(unclear) me as well when I was younger when I was younger I used to always think yeah that is that (interruption) really is Santa Claus

Speaker 3:

what about the Tooth Fairy business

Speaker 2:

m you know my mum and dad right (pause) they're Asian right and they don't understand and all the kids used to say 'well you know when your tooth comes out'

Speaker 3:

aye (interruption) put it under your pillow

Speaker 2:

'put it under your pillow and y you get some money' so I when my tooth (unclear)

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

I put it under the pillow I waited three nights I didn't get no money and (pause) I told my mam and dad (pause) and then as I got older I found out that it's your mam and dad that put the (interruption) money there

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

honestly (unclear) and I used to really think that that was the Tooth Fairy was going to come (pause) and ehm (laughter) (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

I think all kids believe that when they're small I think everybody believes that

Speaker 2:

everybody believes that

Speaker 3:

even Santa Claus I really because when I was small right I used to really think oh there's Santa Claus there is there is Santa Claus

Speaker 2:

but you (unclear)

Speaker 3:

but when you when you grow old (pause) you know you gradually find out oh that is just you know it's a pack of

Speaker 2:

it's just (pause) make believe

Speaker 3:

fairy tales

Speaker 2:

but honestly I still remember the our the Christmas parties (pause) and when (interruption) Santa Claus used to come

Speaker 3:

(unclear) nice time juniors (interruption) the Christmas party

Speaker 2:

I know I used to love it

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

I wonder what I wonder what happened to some of the people (pause) honestly

Speaker 3:

do you still see much of your teachers

Speaker 2:

no as I said (unclear) most of the they've all changed there's not one sing even the head teachers have changed now

Speaker 3:

no head teacher hasn't changed at Canning Street he's still there what's he called Mr (pause) oh God (pause) (NAME) (interruption) Mr (NAME)

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

pitch black hair (pause) and he was like (pause) God (pause) (laughter)

Speaker 2:

they've all changed there's not one single teacher from when I was there now at either (pause) ehm

Speaker 3:

secretary's still there

Speaker 2:

infants or the juniors

Speaker 3:

the Canning Street secretary's (interruption) still there

Speaker 2:

just changed honestly it's just totally different it's totally different school now when you go in it's not the same

Speaker 3:

Canning Street been changed last last two or three years ago (unclear) they'd knocked the old one down because (unclear) was really old man (unclear) nineteen oh one and they knocked it down in the nineteen eighty eight or something

Speaker 2:

(unclear) and they made a new school

Speaker 3:

they made a new school

Speaker 2:

oh aye (unclear)

Speaker 3:

it was really old man it was really tall building as well now the new one's just a flat building one floor

Speaker 2:

it's like a bungalow isn't it yeah with one storey

Speaker 3:

one floor yeah

Speaker 2:

yeah walked past it I've seen it

Speaker 3:

but the old one it was dead tall man it was like (interruption) dead big building it was

Speaker 2:

scary ours (pause) was dead old and we used to always say there's a (interruption) Blue Lady upstairs

Speaker 3:

school toilets (interruption) remember the school toilets

Speaker 2:

school toilets (laughter)

Speaker 3:

the ghosts

Speaker 2:

oh

Speaker 3:

oh my God

Speaker 2:

I know (unclear) we used no one like you know when it was we're after we'd been using the paints the other day right and (unclear) we used to have paint monitors right I was going to go and wash the trays today right and I remember it was me and my friend right and I for this this week it was our turn (pause) and honestly we were just so scared to go in the girls' toilets (pause) because everyone was just saying 'oh there's a Blue Lady and she (unclear) the girls' toilets'

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

I used to actually think when I'm going to go I never used to go in the toilets (unclear) never used to go to the school toilets

Speaker 3:

(laughter) same here

Speaker 2:

I used to always think I'm going to open the door and there'll be a Blue Lady standing there (laughter)

Speaker 3:

I used to be so scared man (unclear) they used to they used to tell us that 'oh God there's a ghost'

Speaker 2:

(laughter)

Speaker 3:

(unclear) once it come running the ghost oh there's footprints on the ceiling

Speaker 2:

(laughter)

Speaker 3:

blood footprints on the sk ceiling and I was so scared I did not go in the toilet even to have a look (unclear) I just believed them

Speaker 2:

I know (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

(unclear) believed what they said

Speaker 2:

i in the junior school right there were these stairs that (pause) the pupils were forbidden to go up like I think it was just teachers because they had stock up there and (pause) they were only allowed to go up there and we used to think that upstairs that's where all the Blue Ladies were honestly and

Speaker 3:

what is a Blue Lady

Speaker 2:

I don't know

Speaker 3:

(laughter)

Speaker 2:

if you asked me now I I just wouldn't know I just couldn't tell you I (pause) it's just like a Blue Lady (interruption) (unclear) Blue Lady

Speaker 3:

oh we were told (unclear) ghosts in the girls' toilets (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

(laughter)

Speaker 3:

was a ghost once I went right (pause) I just needed the toilet desperately I had to go right otherwise I didn't ever went to the toilet right I went right and you know the door the way the door creaks

Speaker 2:

yeah

Speaker 3:

a door started creaking (unclear) I just ran I goes 'no way I'm not going to the toilet no way'

Speaker 2:

I never went I never ever used to go (interruption) never ever

Speaker 3:

plus it used to be quiet like (unclear) quiet you know and just silent and when the door creaks you'd really think oh my God (interruption) oh my God oh my God there's something there's something there

Speaker 2:

there's a ghost there's a ghost there's a ghost there's something there there's something there I know

Speaker 3:

and plus it used to be it used to be dark around the girls' toilets because it used to be like like a corner thing

Speaker 2:

in a corner yeah so was ours

Speaker 3:

used to be so dark

Speaker 2:

like w where where the lessons took place the classrooms were in like a different place

Speaker 3:

aye

Speaker 2:

and to go to the toilet you had to walk through

Speaker 3:

yeah

Speaker 2:

a little corridor and then go to the toilets they were like separate

Speaker 3:

yeah (interruption) some were really dark

Speaker 2:

and oh it was so scary but now I think back and I just laugh (pause) honestly

Speaker 3:

honestly you think that you're so stupid

Speaker 2:

you're so stupid but (pause) all the kids go through that I mean (pause) I think that probably the my little brother goes on about it now there's Blue Ladies and all this

Speaker 3:

they (unclear) still say it

Speaker 2:

and (unclear) they still say it that there's Blue Ladies and ghosts and well I think to myself (unclear) that that's what I used that's what they used to say when I was there as well but I never saw a Blue Lady

Speaker 3:

oh God I was so scared about this ghost business man

Speaker 2:

honestly

Speaker 3:

really (interruption) scared

Speaker 2:

I remember we went for the parents' evening on ehm Tuesday to get his report and I actually went past the girls' toilets and I went in to ha like you know just to get a tissue and that and the toilets are so small you know (pause) when you look at them you just think oh God you know (pause) I used to b I used to be that small and

Speaker 3:

(unclear) first years in our school

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

see how small they are (interruption) when you look back

Speaker 2:

I I wasn't that small

Speaker 3:

oh aye (laughter)

Speaker 2:

I know for a fact I wasn't that small when I (interruption) came here

Speaker 3:

you you were taller (interruption) than anybody

Speaker 2:

I was always tall I was always tall

Speaker 3:

(interruption) but now (unclear)

Speaker 2:

I've always been tall right but now (pause) all the rest of them are taller than me

Speaker 3:

I know (laughter)

Speaker 2:

I think I'm I've I've been (interruption) left the smallest (unclear)

Speaker 3:

me and you were the same height me and you were the same height when we came but gradually right the the first years are coming they're (unclear) smaller and (interruption) smaller and smaller and smaller

Speaker 2:

and smaller and smaller they're getting they look younger and younger I wasn't that I wasn't that small I was really tall but when I came to fourth and fifth year all the other kids (pause) like all other students

Speaker 3:

they grew

Speaker 2:

they just grew and they just went past me I was just left there

Speaker 3:

(laughter)

Speaker 2:

(unclear) just left and now honestly (interruption) just some of the kids

Speaker 3:

I wish I was a bit taller

Speaker 2:

like (NAME) (NAME) you were talking about he's one typical example of someone who's changed so much before (unclear) when I used to talk to him I used to either look down at him or he used to look up at me now when I see talk to I go 'hello (NAME)' you know I've got to look up to him

Speaker 3:

I know (unclear)

Speaker 2:

and I feel dead small

Speaker 3:

I know man

Speaker 2:

it's dead weird honestly

Speaker 3:

and (NAME) (unclear) he's very he was very tall when he came

Speaker 2:

he was dead small

Speaker 3:

he was a pure midget and when when you talk to him now you've got to look up to him

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

he looks so tall

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

it's mostly the men who grow taller can't think many girls are very tall (interruption) (NAME) was

Speaker 2:

(NAME) was

Speaker 3:

(laughter)

Speaker 2:

(NAME) was (laughter) (NAME) was tall (laughter)

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

how tall is she six foot

Speaker 3:

she must have been bigger than (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

she was so tall

Speaker 3:

(unclear) you wouldn't believe it but she's got taller because she she had this push chair right (unclear) bending over because she couldn't like you know like she was like bending over (interruption) thingie in the push chair

Speaker 2:

honestly oh my God

Speaker 3:

she was that tall (pause) (unclear) (pause) she (unclear) tall

Speaker 2:

she was she was

Speaker 3:

(unclear) midget midget (unclear) down there you used to think oh God this is so embarrassing because (pause) God man she's very tall

Speaker 2:

she was your best friend when you were younger wasn't she

Speaker 3:

well I had all sorts of friends me

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

and all of them left as well

Speaker 2:

you've got to say me and you are the closest though

Speaker 3:

yeah

Speaker 2:

me and you are dead close well (pause) yeah we are

Speaker 3:

closer (unclear) I've been with everybody else because

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

your childhood friends are different

Speaker 2:

I know it's friends that you have at this age that you

Speaker 3:

yeah

Speaker 2:

remember all your life because

Speaker 3:

you you remember your childhood friends as well I remember mine (interruption) I had loads

Speaker 2:

I remember mine as well I used to have this fat friend called (NAME) and I remember when she got ehm she got nits in her hair

Speaker 3:

(laughter)

Speaker 2:

oh my God I still remember (pause) we were in the third year juniors right and the nit nurse came round and she was going through everyone's hair and they found nits in her hair (pause) and my God you know all the other kids right you know they were making fun of her and they were saying to me 'don't hang around with her' you know 'she's got nits'

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

and sh I and I used to say 'no she's my best friend I don't care if she's got nits I'm still going to hang around with her' and you'll never guess what happened

Speaker 3:

you got them

Speaker 2:

I got the nits

Speaker 3:

(laughter)

Speaker 2:

(laughter) do you know what I mean I was in the same boat as her but then I got this lotion and I got rid of them

Speaker 3:

I d I d I did get nits (unclear)

Speaker 2:

two two times I got nits and after that

Speaker 3:

I got them once

Speaker 2:

I've got them twice I still remember

Speaker 3:

got (unclear)

Speaker 2:

after that anybody who I just even (interruption) suspected

Speaker 3:

got them of my cousins you know

Speaker 2:

that I got nits I I j I w I used to just keep away from them I goes no way

Speaker 3:

I know I know how you feel (unclear)

Speaker 2:

it's disgusting

Speaker 3:

oh I know

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

and when they show you the video of nits at close up

Speaker 2:

oh my God

Speaker 3:

it's disgusting

Speaker 2:

(unclear) it's terrible (interruption) ugh

Speaker 3:

you think ugh they're on my hair

Speaker 2:

(unclear) hair

Speaker 3:

ugh

Speaker 2:

drinking my blood

Speaker 3:

ugh don't put it like that sounds sick

Speaker 2:

(laughter)

Speaker 3:

ugh I'm telling you

Speaker 2:

oh God

Speaker 3:

remember (NAME) we used to hate her (unclear) because she had nits

Speaker 2:

you could see the nits walking on her forehead

Speaker 3:

I'll tell you in English (pause) (unclear) God

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

(unclear) climbing down

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

and I I goes 'oh my God keep away (interruption) keep away'

Speaker 2:

keep away (laughter)

Speaker 3:

it was like (pause) cross

Speaker 2:

cr (laughter) ee hey I swear honestly (pause) what's (NAME) doing now oh she's at college isn't she

Speaker 3:

mm (unclear) all the time you'd ask her every time she'll tell you a different thing

Speaker 2:

she's a liar

Speaker 3:

(unclear) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

look my friendship bracelet broke that's why mine and (NAME)'s friendship broke as well

Speaker 3:

when did it break

Speaker 2:

it broke on what day did they go on the trip

Speaker 3:

Bradford ehm was Tuesday

Speaker 2:

Tuesday and on Monday

Speaker 3:

no

Speaker 2:

(unclear) they went on Wednesday

Speaker 3:

no they didn't

Speaker 2:

they did they went on Wednesday

Speaker 3:

no they didn't

Speaker 2:

yes (pause) yes they did

Speaker 3:

Wednesday (unclear) I was talking to (pause) (NAME) yesterday man

Speaker 2:

oh aye they went on (interruption) Tuesday

Speaker 3:

Tuesday

Speaker 2:

well my friendship brace bracelet broke on Monday night (unclear) I was talking to (NAME) in the ehm thingie and on Wednesday he went and on Thursday he was horrible to us yesterday and honestly all last night I was trying to fix it back together I goes 'oh you know I'm not' (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

you'd better tell him

Speaker 2:

and honestly I can't get it back together but I've still kept it I won't throw it away (pause) I'm going to show him

Speaker 3:

(unclear) (NAME) done he ripped his he ripped his jeans and (NAME) took them home (NAME) goes 'I'm going to keep them as a friendship friendship band thing' she says (unclear) tie them all up (unclear) fasten it round her wrist

Speaker 2:

oh God

Speaker 3:

(unclear) would you

Speaker 2:

no I wouldn't do something like that (laughter)

Speaker 3:

(NAME)'s mad man

Speaker 2:

is (NAME) all right today

Speaker 3:

oh he's acting normal you know the (interruption) way he laughs (unclear)

Speaker 2:

oh (unclear) (unclear) I'm scared to go up to him

Speaker 3:

jokes

Speaker 2:

then he might take another fit on us

Speaker 3:

(unclear) no he's normal today I told him I goes 'God you should see (unclear) he just like (unclear) seen a ghost' he says 'oh I know man it wasn't' (unclear) he says 'I had had a bad day yesterday a really bad day'

Speaker 2:

oh

Speaker 3:

and (NAME) he's acting normal (unclear) (NAME)

Speaker 2:

he had his suit on did he

Speaker 3:

yeah

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

oh you haven't seen him (unclear)

Speaker 2:

I haven't seen him in the (interruption) suit yet

Speaker 3:

oh oh

Speaker 2:

he was telling me yesterday he came in I was sitting by myself and he goes 'I've got a interview at BT tomorrow' and I wished him luck I goes you know 'good luck to you' and I didn't I didn't come (unclear) this morning (unclear)

Speaker 3:

he was really smart he had a well I right he came in right and (NAME) and them were laughing right and asked them what yous were laughing at right

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

(unclear) oh (unclear) (NAME)'s got a suit on right and I thought it was all black but when I seen him go past (unclear) (unclear) he's got purple jacket on (unclear) purple jacket (pause) (unclear) looked really smart he had a tie as well

Speaker 2:

mm (interruption) oh

Speaker 3:

(unclear) took tie off he took the tie off but he had the interview in the morning right and (NAME) goes 'well he could have gone home and got changed'

Speaker 2:

(unclear)

Speaker 3:

she goes (unclear) show us man how smart he looked

Speaker 2:

oh

Speaker 3:

he did look really smart got to admit that

Speaker 2:

mm (interruption) he's he's good looking (NAME)

Speaker 3:

I goes to him I goes to him 'don't be offended but most of the time you look like a right scruff but you look really smart today'

Speaker 2:

yeah he can I've seen him going to weddings and that he looks really nice

Speaker 3:

have you

Speaker 2:

I've seen him because they've got they've got the shop and he's another one you know how long I've known that (NAME) I've known (NAME) since I was that high because when we used to live in Sidney Grove they used to live in Sidney Grove as well then when we moved to Wingrove Avenue they bought the shop on Hadrian Road and tha th th ever since then I've known him (pause) I used to hate (NAME) when I was younger I used to despise him I used to (pause) just hate (interruption) but

Speaker 3:

ev even in first second third fourth and fifth year we used to hate him

Speaker 2:

hate (NAME) I don't know

Speaker 3:

because he he had such a bad reputation or something

Speaker 2:

he didn't have a bad reputation when he was younger man he had a good reputation it's just that (unclear)

Speaker 3:

(unclear) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

this was no man when he was younger I don't know he was always like '(NAME)'s bad keep away from (NAME)' but I got (interruption) to know (NAME) he's lovely

Speaker 3:

he (pause) get get to know him (unclear) sixth form (interruption) he's really sweet he's really nice

Speaker 2:

he's really nice he's really nice (pause) just proves what kind of thing people can (unclear) (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

remember (NAME) he used to be so quiet (unclear) the beginning of the year

Speaker 2:

never talked to a girl

Speaker 3:

and beginning of the year look at him now he as soon as he sees me he just starts arguing with me

Speaker 2:

he's so horrible you know yesterday (pause) I don't know I said something to him about the trip and he got a hold of me

Speaker 3:

he gets hold of you doesn't even let go

Speaker 2:

he does and my arms were killing me

Speaker 3:

I know

Speaker 2:

afterwards you know I felt like saying 'God hi (NAME) you've got such a hard grip'

Speaker 3:

(unclear) (NAME) wanted (NAME)'s key right and I says to him 'no I won't give it to you because of the way you were acting' and he got hold of me and he goes 'give it to me' I goes 'no let go of me'

Speaker 2:

(laughter)

Speaker 3:

he goes 'give it to me' I goes 'let go of me and I'll give it to you' he goes 'no give me the f (pause) key first' I goes '(unclear) let go of me' (unclear) push him off he's like gets hold of you he doesn't let go man

Speaker 2:

he's crackers

Speaker 3:

he's nuts I'm telling you

Speaker 2:

he's totally nuts totally totally nuts

Speaker 3:

well that proves how different proves like when you think once you get to know someone how different (interruption) they can be

Speaker 2:

how different I know (pause) (NAME)'s all right I used to hate (NAME) you know I used to think (NAME)'s bad you know get the cross out keep away from (NAME) but I got to know (NAME) he's really nice

Speaker 3:

(unclear) proves when you get to know someone (unclear)

Speaker 2:

honestly yesterday when he did that I felt so bad inside I felt what have I done what have I said to him why's he acting like that

Speaker 3:

had a bad day

Speaker 2:

and honestly when I heard about his dad I felt so sorry for him I couldn't stop thinking about (NAME) last night I goes (interruption) 'I hope his dad's all right'

Speaker 3:

(unclear) he come over he goes 'oh should I tell you what happened yesterday then' I goes '(unclear) howay then (NAME) tell us'

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

he was like laughing (unclear) I felt like saying 'oh God you know I feel dead sorry for your dad'

Speaker 2:

(interruption) his dad's a really nice

Speaker 3:

his dad his dad's really ill in hospital (unclear)

Speaker 2:

really really ill

Speaker 3:

yeah he's really ill

Speaker 2:

oh (pause) I hope he gets better soon

Speaker 3:

it was his sister's birthday yesterday he says as soon as he woke up he had a fight with her

Speaker 2:

which sister

Speaker 3:

I don't know what sister but he said it was his sister's birthday

Speaker 2:

oh (pause) their dad's a really he's really old you know but he looks d he's dead fit (pause) for his age

Speaker 3:

mm

Speaker 2:

like if you look at him (interruption) you wouldn't think

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

he's about eighty he's about eighty ninety and he looks about the six he looks only about sixty he's a really nice man I mean I've talked to him but you know (pause) (NAME) and them (pause) (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

oh well that's his business (unclear)

Speaker 2:

I know (unclear) to do with us

Speaker 3:

what (unclear) going to do this afternoon

Speaker 2:

don't know got work

Speaker 3:

(unclear) Mr (NAME)'s work (pause) (interruption) (unclear) teacher

Speaker 2:

(unclear) (pause) Mr (NAME) oh he's weird Mr (NAME) oh no man he's all right (pause) I divn't know he's all right yeah he is

Speaker 3:

is he

Speaker 2:

yeah

Speaker 3:

since when

Speaker 2:

(laughter) no I think he's g he's slackened down a lot I mean he was like at the beginning of the year he was like (pause) dead strict

Speaker 3:

oh I know he started off strict and now

Speaker 2:

do you remember do you remember the teachers when we were young how strict they used to be

Speaker 3:

do you remember Mr (NAME)

Speaker 2:

mm

Speaker 3:

I used to be petrified of him (interruption) man

Speaker 2:

on the first day that I came to this school right in the afternoon we had lessons right

Speaker 3:

aye

Speaker 2:

and we had him

Speaker 3:

him

Speaker 2:

for history

Speaker 3:

aye

Speaker 2:

oh my God I was so scared I used to think all the teachers are going to be like him he was like after every sentence he'd look at my face right and go 'okay' and I would just like go I was dead little and I used to go 'okay' (laughter) you know (interruption) I was just so scared of him honestly

Speaker 3:

(unclear) so scared of him

Speaker 2:

oh (interruption) honestly

Speaker 3:

but you know

Speaker 2:

he's left now

Speaker 3:

yeah I know but you know what I found out after like a few years that he was always sc he was only (pause) hard with the first years but second the rest of years he was like such a softie

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

honestly I used to be so (interruption) scared of him

Speaker 2:

because he thought he could scare us (interruption) you know what I mean I know he did

Speaker 3:

he did he did scare me

Speaker 2:

one that scared me more than any teacher (pause) has got to be Mr (NAME)

Speaker 3:

(laughter)

Speaker 2:

I was just so scared of him I had five years I was in his class right and I wouldn't (interruption) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

if I was five minutes late I wouldn't have the guts to go in

Speaker 3:

I know you didn't (interruption) I remember

Speaker 2:

I was so scared I used to be so scared that he's going to you know tell me off in front of the whole class and you know it's going to be (interruption) embarrassing

Speaker 3:

embarrass you

Speaker 2:

but

Speaker 3:

Mr (NAME) wasn't like that (interruption) he was good

Speaker 2:

I know he was he was a laugh Mr (NAME) wasn't he

Speaker 3:

still still see him (unclear)

Speaker 2:

but honestly that that is good you know in a teacher because (pause) it keeps discipline amongst the kids

Speaker 3:

and plus remember we we (unclear) used to actu actually call Mr (NAME) used to call him (NAME) right he didn't used to mind he's like take it as like (pause) normally

Speaker 2:

oh

Speaker 3:

we said (NAME) (NAME) we didn't used to call him Mr (NAME)

Speaker 2:

oh

Speaker 3:

never

Speaker 2:

oh

Speaker 3:

never ever called him Mr (NAME) (pause) (NAME) (laughter) (interruption) what a name

Speaker 2:

(NAME)

Speaker 3:

everybody calls him (NAME) (pause) looks like lunch is over (pause) what's going to happen to our bait sir (laughter)

Speaker 2:

(laughter) (unclear)

Speaker 3:

I bet you he's forgot

Speaker 2:

(laughter) no he won't have

Speaker 3:

I bet you he has

Speaker 2:

he better have some bait for we

Speaker 3:

(laughter)

Speaker 2:

(laughter)

Speaker 3:

we go for him everyday

Speaker 2:

we go for him everyday I know

Speaker 3:

eeh honestly

Speaker 3:

(unclear) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

oh I think he's nice

Speaker 3:

Mr (NAME)'s nice (interruption) especially when he was giving mugs out yesterday he's so sweet

Speaker 2:

(unclear) oh

Speaker 3:

(NAME) goes you can get his signed (pause) (unclear) Mr (NAME) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

oh (pause) he's got to be one of my favourite teachers he was always dead nice I remember when we used to get him (interruption) for history right

Speaker 3:

plus so old

Speaker 2:

he's so (pause) he's you know (pause) (interruption) (NAME)

Speaker 3:

(unclear) I know

Speaker 2:

(NAME) (NAME) how how old's (NAME)

Speaker 3:

twenty seven

Speaker 2:

twenty he's going to be twenty eight right this month and when he was young he used to go to school and Mr (NAME) used to be here

Speaker 3:

(unclear)

Speaker 2:

he still tells us about him

Speaker 3:

(unclear) (unclear)

Speaker 2:

I know

Speaker 3:

all of them they know Mr Mr (NAME)

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