People

Professor Guy Austin

Guy Austin Guy is Professor of French Studies in the School of Modern Languages and Director of the Research Centre in Film and Digital Media at Newcastle University. His research interests, amongst others, focus on the theories and ideas that constitute cultural representations of conflict, trauma, and war in modern French film and in Algerian cinema. To this end, Guy has published articles on trauma in French and Algerian film, on representations of the Algerian War in recent French cinema, and on memory and conflict in Algeria. Further, representations of conflict and their relation to formations of national identity was also a key part in Guy’s last monograph, entitled Algerian National Cinema (Manchester University Press, 2012).

Currently, Guy is continuing his research with an investigation of trauma in the so-called Algerian civil war of the 1990s and its representation in Algerian documentary cinema. He joined Newcastle University in 2010 following a long tenure at Sheffield University. He holds a BA (1st Class Hons) in French and English from Oxford University and a PhD in French from Leeds University. He teaches on a range of undergraduate and postgraduate programs, the details of which can be found on his university staff page.

Guy welcomes enquiries from students wishing to undertake doctoral work on French cinema and French literature, and on wider aspects of Algerian politics, cinema, and surrealism.

Contact Details:

School of Modern Languages
Newcastle University
Old Library Building
Newcastle Upon Tyne
NE1 7RU

Email:guy.austin@newcastle.ac.uk

Staff Profile: www.ncl.ac.uk/sml/staff/profile/guy.austin


Professor Claudia Baldoli

Claudia is Senior Lecturer in Modern European History at Newcastle University. Her principal research interests are in the cultural and political history of Italy in the twentieth century, particularly the interwar period and the Second World War from the civilians’ perspective. She has published on the origins of Fascism in northern Italy, on Italian Fascism abroad and on the bombing of Italy in the Second World War. In 2007-2010 she was involved in an AHRC-funded project, based at the Universities of Newcastle, Exeter and Reading, on ‘Bombing, States and Peoples in Western Europe, 1940-1945’. In 2012-13 she was Balsdon Fellow at the British School at Rome, researching a project entitled ‘In Search of the White International: Catholic-Communism between the Wars’. As part of that project, she is currently writing on the opposition to the First World War in Italy.

Contact Details:

School of History, Classics and Archaeology
Armstrong Building
Newcastle University
NE1 7RU

Email: Claudia.baldoli@newcastle.ac.uk

Staff Profile: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/historical/staff/profile/claudia.baldoli


Daniel Bos

Daniel BosDaniel is a doctoral student based in Geography researching the popular geopolitics of military video games. His main interests are in the burgeoning field of popular geopolitics, alongside the intimate relationship between the military and popular culture. His PhD research is positioned at the intersection between popular culture and world politics, with an explicit focus on how audiences engage, interact and consume commercial military video games, such as ‘Call of Duty’. Furthermore, Daniel is interested in more-than-representational epistemologies, and aims to direct attention to the visceral, emotive and affective capabilities characteristic of these video games.

Daniel holds a BA (Hons) degree in Geography from Newcastle University (2009) and an MA Human Geography Research (Newcastle University, 2011). Previous research dissertations have focused on audience engagements with military video games and population growth in peri-urban locations. Daniel has experience as a Research Assistant at Newcastle University (2010), working on projects focusing on contemporary military memoirs, military landscapes and an examination of the media coverage of the military repatriations at Wootton Bassett.

Daniel welcomes enquiries from those interested in any aspects of his work, and remains keen to speak to players of Call of Duty and related games about their experiences.

Contact Details:

School of Geography Politics and Sociology
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
UK

Tel: 0191 208 8510
Email: daniel.bos@ncl.ac.uk


Dr Sarah Campbell

Sarah Campbell Sarah is a lecturer in Irish history in the School of History, Classics and Archaeology at Newcastle University. Her research interests include nineteenth- and twentieth-century Irish history, with a focus on the Northern Ireland conflict, the history of political violence, and Anglo-Irish relations. She is currently completing a monograph on Gerry Fitt and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) in Northern Ireland during the 1970s which will be published by Manchester University Press in 2014. In 2012, she received an Oireachtas (Irish Parliament) bursary to research the Fenian trials of 1865-1867. She is currently using this research to examine British counter-insurgency policies in Ireland from the mid-nineteenth century until the present day. She is particularly interested in British security policy in Northern Ireland during the ‘Troubles’ and its impact on Anglo-Irish relations and the on-going peace process.

Sarah has extensive research experience in Irish radio and television, and was a research assistant on the ‘Peace Process: Layers of Meaning’ project, which is part-funded by the European Peace III grant. She is also an editor for ‘History and Policy’ on History Hub, a website funded by the School of History and Archives in University College Dublin.

Sarah joined the School of History, Classics and Archaeology in 2012. Prior to this she lectured in Northern Ireland history in the School of History and Archives in University College Dublin (UCD). She holds a BA, MA and PhD from University College Dublin. Her PhD was funded by the Irish Research Council for Humanities and Social Sciences (IRCHSS). At Newcastle University she teaches a Stage 3 module HIS3032 Civil Rights and Armalites: Northern Ireland since 1969 and Stage 1 module POL1000 Introduction to History and Politics.

Contact Details:

School of History, Classics and Archaeology
Armstrong Building
Newcastle University
NE1 7RU

Email: sarah.campbell@ncl.ac.uk

Staff Profile: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/historical/staff/profile/sarah.campbell


Dr Martin Coward

Martin Coward Martin is a senior lecturer in International Politics at Newcastle University. His research focuses on questions of war and (in)security, along with the related issues of political violence, identity, community, and global urbanisation. Much of Martin’s work to date has been an investigation of the phenomenon of Urbicide: the widespread targeting and destruction of cities in the post-Cold War era, particularly during the 1992-1995 Bosnian War. The outcomes of this research were published in his recent book entitled Urbicide: The Politics of Urban Destruction.

Presently, Martin is continuing his work on the insecurity and violence that accompanies contemporary urbanisation. His current research project seeks to examine the wider problem of warfare in cities. This work aims to understand how instances such as the terrorist attacks in London on the 7th of July 2005 demonstrate the emergence of new and distinctly urban forms of political violence. Martin has referred to this as the ‘urbanisation of security’, the process by which security practices become urbanised while urban spaces simultaneously become permeated by security technologies. Aside from this research, Martin also continues to investigate and publish on the conceptual and theoretical problems posed to International Relations Theory by urbanisation, questioning the ways in which it reshapes the nature of global order and the constitution of the political subject.

Martin is keen to hear from both potential doctoral and post-doctoral researchers interested in any of his broad research interests, and welcomes more general enquiries about any aspect of his work.

Contact Details:

40-42 Great North Road
Newcastle Upon Tyne
NE1 7RU

Email: martin.coward@ncl.ac.uk

Personal Website: www.martincoward.net


Martin Farr

Daniel Bos Martin Farr is Senior Lecturer in modern and contemporary British history in the School of History, Classic and Archaeology at Newcastle University.

He is principally interested in the politics of war and security in Britain, from the First World War to the present. After a BA in politics at Exeter, his military, war, and security research began with a PhD at Glasgow under Hew Strachan on British finance and strategy in the First World War. His research has continued to explore British politics during the First World War (relating to conscription, broader strategic questions, and the 1918 general election), and an exploration of the Labour Party and strategic bombing in the Second World War. He undertakes undergraduate and postgraduate supervision on all aspects of defence and security history and policy, is module leader of HIS2124 A History of Contemporary Britain, and teaches and supervises on all aspects of British history since 1914.

Contact Details:

Dr Martin Farr
School of History, Classics and Archaeology
Newcastle University
Newcastle
NE1 7RU, UK

Tel: 0191 208 5077
Mobile: 0793 922 7631
Fax: 0191 208 6484
Email: martin.farr@ncl.ac.uk
Twitter: @martinjohnfarr
Staff Profile: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/historical/staff/profile/martin.farr


Professor Steve Graham

Steve Graham Steve is currently Professor of Cities and Society in the Global Urban Research Unit in Newcastle University’s School of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape. His military, war and security interests focus primarily around the links between security, militarisation, and urban life; and in particular the politics of urban security and what he has termed the ‘New Military Urbanism’. This work has sought to address the ways in which questions of war, security, and political violence now encroach deeply into the everyday spaces of urban life. His 2010 book Cities Under Siege: The New Military Urbanism, brought these concerns together in a critical expose of the increasingly intertwined nature of urbanity, militarism, and security.

Currently, Steve is developing his research in two new directions. Firstly, he is undertaking critical analyses of the concepts and discourses that surround contemporary discussions of the connections between ‘security’ and contemporary cities. Secondly, he is preparing a book centred on analysing the key political challenges of our time from a vertical perspective, incorporating the connections between the urban subterrain, the architectures and infrastructures of urban life, and aerial and spatial geopolitics. Steve teaches on a range of modules throughout APL, and is Module Leader for the modules entitled Understanding Cities (Stage 2 BA Town Planning) and Cities, Security, and Resilience (MSc Town Planning). He holds a BSc in Geography from the University of Southampton, an MPhil in Town and Country Planning from Newcastle University, and a PhD in Science and Technology Policy from Manchester University. Steve welcomes queries from prospective postgraduates interested in pursuing doctoral research in any of his key research areas. He also welcomes enquiries from those interested in discussing his past, present, or future work.

Contact Details:

Email: steve.graham@ncl.ac.uk
Telephone: (0)191 222 8579
Staff Profile: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/apl/staff/profile/steve.graham

Dr Kyle Grayson

Kyle Grayson Kyle Grayson is a Senior Lecturer in International Politics in the School of Geography, Politics, and Sociology at Newcastle University UK His current research is interested in examining the interplay of politics, culture, and popular narratives of security. To this end, he is exploring how assassination and targeted killing have been presented as a problem in the legal, strategic, and political discourses that make-up counter-terrorism policy. This is scheduled to be published by Hirst in 2015. Aside from this, Kyle is also interested in the visual politics and political economy of new media and web 2.0. In 2011, he received a University Teaching Learning and Student Experience Committee Innovation Award at Newcastle University for implementing problem-based learning into an undergraduate visual politics research seminar, and he continues to develop his research in this area.

Kyle is a co-editor of the UK Political Studies Association's journal Politics (Wiley-Blackwell), an associate editor of the new journal Critical Studies on Security (Routledge), and a co-editor of the Popular Culture and World Politics book series (Routledge). Previously, he was a post-doctoral fellow of the Canadian Consortium on Human Security and Associate Director of the York Center for International and Security Studies (York University, Canada). Kyle teaches modules in international relations, geopolitics, popular culture, and research methods at Newcastle University, and in 2012 and 2013 he was nominated by students for teaching awards in multiple categories including Innovation in Teaching, Pastoral Care, Innovation in Feedback, and Research Supervision.

Kyle offers postgraduate supervision in the broadly defined areas of critical security studies, popular culture, and post-structuralism, and welcomes enquiries into his work at all times.

Contact Details:

School of Geography Politics and Sociology
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
UK

Email: kyle.grayson@ncl.ac.uk
Telephone: (0)191 222 5836
Staff Profile: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/gps/politics/about/staff/profile/kyle.grayson
Twitter: @chasing_dragons


K. Neil Jenkings

Neil Jenkings Neil is Senior Research Associate in the School of Geography Politics and Sociology at Newcastle University. He is a currently a co-investigator on the ESRC funded 'The Value of the University Armed Service Units’ project with Dr Alison William and Prof. Rachel Woodward (2012-14). He was recently co-investigator on the ESRC-funded project 'The Social Production of the Contemporary British Military Memoir' (2009-2011). Neil was also the researcher on the ESRC-funded study 'Negotiating identity and Representation in the Mediated Armed Forces' with Dr Trish Winter and Professor Rachel Woodward (2006-07).

Neil holds a BSc (Hons), MA, and MSc degrees in sociology and social research disciplines, has a PhD from University of Nottingham in socio-legal decision-making, and did his Post-Doctoral Studies at the School of Pharmacy UCL in socio-medical decision-making. Before joining the School, Neil was a Senior Research Associate in the Sowerby Centre for Health Informatics, and he has also held research posts in Newcastle University's Faculty of Medical Sciences, in the Institute for Health and Society and has also worked as a Research Consultant at the Dept. of Health Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Leicester.

As well as publishing military-related studies, Neil has worked on and published a number of workplace studies and studies of work in health, especially in relation to the design and use of health technologies in primary care, secondary care, social care and biobanking. He has also published on the collaborative local practices of rock climbing.

Contact details:

Dr K. Neil Jenkings
School of Geography Politics and Sociology
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU

Tel: 0191 208 3806
Email: Neil.jenkings@ncl.ac.uk


Sobia Kaker

Sobia is a doctoral student currently pursuing an interdisciplinary PhD at Newcastle University, focusing on cities, security, and political violence in Karachi (Pakistan). Her broad research interests and expertise include urban conflict and violence, governance and local and global security. Her doctoral project is analysing ‘enclavisation’ as an agential process that is closely tied to crises of governance and security in megacities of the global south.

Alongside her PhD, Sobia is also involved in research projects on urban security and governance through affiliations with LSE Cities (research centre at the London School of Economics, UK) as a researcher working on Urban Uncertainty; and also with the Center for Research and Security Studies (in Pakistan) as a Visiting Research Fellow.

Contact details:

Email: s.a.kaker@ncl.ac.uk

Dr Darren Kelsey

Darren Kelsey

Dr Darren Kelsey is a Lecturer in Journalism in the School of Arts and Cultures at Newcastle University. Darren’s primary research interests are in the fields of journalism studies and critical discourse studies. He is particularly interested in the relationships between media, culture and politics. His past research has focused on war, propaganda and mythology in relation to terrorism. Much of this published work has used critical discourse analysis combined with frameworks of mythology to analyse the myth of the “Blitz spirit” in British newspaper responses to the July 7th bombings in London. By conceptualising the Blitz spirit as a myth, Darren has scrutinised the ways in which journalists deploy historical analogies – such as the Blitz and comparisons with the Second World War – to inform the public about contemporary, international and domestic conflicts. Based partly on this work, Darren is currently preparing a monograph on the ideological role of Second World War discourses and national identity after the July 7th bombings.

Presently, Darren is continuing his work in the field of journalism and critical discourse studies by examining moral storytelling in relation to the London riots and the banking crisis. He is also conducting research into power, surveillance and national security on social media; developing and applying critical frameworks of discourse, ideology, context, and surveillance theory to analyse digital media technologies in the field of critical discourse studies. Darren holds a BA (Hons) in Journalism, Film and Broadcasting, an MA in Political Communication, and a PhD from the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies at Cardiff University. He teaches a range of BA and MA modules in the areas of journalism, politics and communication. Finally, he is co-convenor of the newly established Newcastle and Northumbria Critical Discourse Group, and is currently preparing a new journal entitled Journalism and Discourse Studies.

Darren supervises BA/MA and PhD students, and he particularly welcomes enquiries from those interesting in developing work on his primary research interests. He also welcomes more general questions and queries about his current and past research.

Contact details:

Media and Cultural Studies; School of Arts and Cultures
Armstrong Building
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
Email: Darren.kelsey@ncl.ac.uk

Staff Profile: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/sacs/staff/profile/darren.kelsey


Nina Laurie

Nina LaurieI have a long track record in development research. My work interrogates knowledge production and professionalization in development, exploring the ways in which culture and identity intersect in contemporary scenarios. I am currently focusing on these issues in a collaborative project on the military as new development actors. Through teaching and research I have engaged extensively in interdisciplinary collaborations promoting South-North dialogue, including through a number of higher education links funded by the Department for International Development and the British Council with universities in the global South.

I have worked for more than two decades in Latin America, including living and working for extended periods in Peru during the civil war, in the 1980s and 1990s, and more recently in Bolivia where I collaborated on an interdisciplinary MA on ‘Territory, Conflict and Interculturality’ at CESU, San Simon University, Cochabamba and conducted research for an ESRC project on indigenous politics and development, focusing particularly on the Bolivian water wars. For the last few years I have also been working in Nepal as part of a recently completed ESRC project on post trafficking livelihoods. In this work on Nepal, issues of militarisation, de-militarisation and the control of bodies and borders have been of central importance in understanding the ways in which returnee trafficked women are able or not to gain citizenship and makes new lives.

Contact details:

Professor Nina Laurie
School of Geography, Politics & Sociology
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
UK

Tel: 0191 208 6346
Email: nina.laurie@newcastle.ac.uk
Staff Profile: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/gps/staff/profile/nina.laurie


Jocelyn Mawdsley

Jocelyn MawdsleyJocelyn is a senior lecturer in European Politics in the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology at Newcastle University. Her research interests follow two main themes. Firstly, she works on the political economy of defence and security. This research has led her to investigate defence procurement, armaments cooperation, defence industrial policy, the arms trade, disarmament and export regulation and security and defence research and technology. She recently completed a project on EU policies on security technologies, funded by the Flemish Peace Institute, which investigated the policy implications of the potential overlap between European internal security and defence technologies, industries and users. Her second main research interest is in European security. Here she has worked predominantly on the EU Common Security and Defence Policy but also has published on the security policies of Britain, France and Germany and on nuclear politics. She has a particular interest in democratic legitimacy and security policy.

Jocelyn joined the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology in 2005. Previously she worked as a temporary lecturer in Security Studies at the University of Manchester and was a Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellow in Bonn and Brussels. She holds a PhD and MA from Newcastle University and a BA in European Studies from Bradford University. Jocelyn teaches POL2034 Politics and Policy of the European Union and POL8036 EU as an International Actor and contributes to teaching on the stage 1 Politics module Order and Disorder: The Shaping of the 21st Century. Jocelyn welcomes enquiries from postgraduates interested in EU politics (especially foreign and security policy), security studies, and French and German politics more broadly.

Contact details:

Dr Jocelyn Mawdsley
School of Geography Politics and Sociology
Politics Building
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU

Tel: 0191 208 7478
Email: jocelyn.mawdsley@ncl.ac.uk
Staff Profile: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/gps/staff/profile/jocelyn.mawdsley


Stephen Moore

Stephen Moore Stephen Moore is a PhD candidate at Newcastle University. His thesis is entitled "After the Blitz: Luftwaffe Operations over the United Kingdom after May 1941", under the supervision of Dr Claudia Baldoli and Dr Martin Farr. This study examines the continuing operations of the Luftwaffe and challenges the conventional view that subsequent attacks on the UK were insignificant. A holistic approach to the bombing will be used, with the military, social and political effects of bombing on British policy and night air defence being assessed, together with the subsequent influence of British bombing policy on German doctrine from 1942. Previously he received a MA with Merit in European History from Newcastle University in 2012. His research interests include the development of strategic bombing, RAF operations during the Second World War, and the military application of scientific developments. He is a member of the Royal Air Force Historical Society and the Second World War Military Operations Group.

Contact Details:

Stephen Moore
School of History, Classics and Archaeology
Armstrong Building
Newcastle University
NE1 7RU
Email: s.moore@newcastle.ac.uk


Ann Murphy

Ann MurphyAnn's research interests are wide ranging and are reflected through a feminist lens. They encompass all areas relating to military geographies, gender identities and militarization, the woman as warrior and the culture of war and its effects on the home front.

Ann is currently writing a PhD thesis on Army wives and their experiences and perceptions of militarized landscapes.

More generally, Ann has an interest in research ethics, in researcher /participant positioning, and in the emotions of research. Her current research reflects her interests in visual qualitative methods of research, and in particular methods and techniques of photo elicitation and qualitative interviewing.

Ann has an MA in Sociology and Social Research (with Merit) from Newcastle University (2006), and a BSc in Sociology and Social Research (First Class Honours) from Northumbria University.

She is a Postgraduate Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) (RGS/IBG), and also a member of the British Sociological Association (BSA) and the International Visual Sociological Association (IVSA).

Her PhD project website can be found here.

Contact details:

Ann Murphy
School of Geography Politics and Sociology
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
UK

Tel: 0191 208 8522
Email: a.l.murphy@ncl.ac.uk or militarywives@ncl.ac.uk
Staff Profile: http://www.students.ncl.ac.uk/a.l.murphy/


Colin Murray

Colin Murray Colin is a Senior Lecturer in Newcastle Law School. He joined Newcastle University in 2006, having completed his postgraduate research into the rise of the national security state in the UK in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries under Ian Leigh’s supervision at Durham.

Colin's research focuses on counter-terrorism law, public law and legal history, writing on these topics in academic outlets and in the wider media. His particular interests lie in the development of counter-terrorism powers in the UK and the legal constraint of the police, military and security and intelligence services. He teaches on the undergraduate LAW1121 Public Law and LAW3035 Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism Law courses and supervises work on all areas of UK public law and European human rights law.

Contact details:

Newcastle Law School
21-24 Windsor Terrace
Newcastle Upon-Tyne
NE1 7RU

Email: colin.murray@ncl.ac.uk

Staff Profile: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/nuls/staff/profile/colin.murray
Twitter: @mastermanmurray


Cahir O’Doherty

Cahir O’Doherty Cahir is currently in the second year of his PhD in the Politics Department of Newcastle University under the supervision of Dr Kyle Grayson and Dr Simon Philpott. The primary research question that Cahir is in the process of tackling is ‘how do political leaders use cultural narratives, tropes, imagery, and language in order to create a sense of ending for conflicts whose end points are open to contestation?’ The conflicts that he is studying are the Iraq War, the War in Afghanistan, and the 2011 NATO intervention in the Libyan Civil War. Culturally, Cahir will primarily focus on Hollywood action-thriller blockbusters such as Bad Boys II, Pirates of the Caribbean, and Captain America: The First Avenger from 2001 to the present day. His secondary research question asks ‘how is resistance to these discourses of endings culturally articulated and incorporated, discredited, or ignored?’ This is proceeding through an examination of other national cinemas such as those of France, Germany, India, and China as well as the international reception of Hollywood films. Cahir’s research is situated within the emerging field of Popular Culture and World Politics which works to trace the causal linkages between politics and culture and vice versa.

Cahir completed his BA at the National University of Ireland, Galway in English Literature and Philosophy before taking a shift in discipline with a MLitt in International Security Studies at the University of St Andrews. At Galway, he took the opportunity to write papers on how politicians use language; on the philosophy of terrorism; political philosophy; as well as the more traditional aspects of English Literature with a particular focus on contemporary Irish poetry. St Andrews gave him a strong foundation in the theories of International Relations and Security as well as topics such as political identity and Sino-US relations. Cahir completed his dissertation in 2012 on the intertextuality between culture and security at the end of the NATO intervention in the Libyan Civil War of 2011. Having grown up in Belfast, Northern Ireland, it has always seemed natural to him that culture and politics are intertwined at every level: from kerbstones, flags, and murals to speeches, policies and political orientations. When the history of Ireland is relayed to a young child mostly through song, poetry, and literature it becomes normal to see culture merely as an extension of the political landscape of a country, and a site for, often violent, contestation.

Contact details:

Email: c.f.o’doherty@newcastle.ac.uk

Matt Ozga-Lawn

Matthew is a Lecturer in Architecture and doctoral student at Newcastle University. His research, teaching and practice is concerned with architectural representation and the studio space, and how varied representational modes and media interact with and influence the design process in this environment. His thesis, undertaken through creative practice, examines these influences through the application of a militarised space onto the studio space – an abandoned underground rifle range in Edinburgh. This application alters the projects, investigations and relations generated through the studio and opens architectural representation onto codes and phenomena normally taken to lie beyond its remit.

Along with James A. Craig, he runs the experimental design platform Stasus (www.stasus.com), recently published in Pamphlet Architecture 32: Resilience, among the latest in the long running and influential series (published by Princeton Architectural Press). His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally.

Contact details:

School of Architecture Planning and Landscape
The Quadrangle
Newcastle University
Newcastle Upon Tyne
NE1 7RU

Email: matthew.ozga-lawn@ncl.ac.uk
Staff profile: www.ncl.ac.uk/apl/staff/profile/matthew.ozga-lawn#tab_profile


Dave Passmore

Dave Passmore Dave is currently a Lecturer in Geography at the University of Toronto Mississauga, and a Visiting Fellow and former Senior Lecturer at the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology at Newcastle University. Although primarily a physical geographer and geoarchaeologist, Dave is also interested in military geographies, archaeology, and the heritage management of 20th century (and especially World War Two) conflict landscapes in Northumberland and the forests of North Western Europe. Previously, he has examined the military geography of the 1940 and 1944 Ardennes campaigns in World War Two, and the geoarchaeology of combat-related field fortifications in the Belgian Ardennes.

Presently, Dave is working on an on-going survey of the extensive but little known Germany Army supply depots in the forests of Normandy in the North West of France, and is also continuing his work in Northumberland, examining the development and preservation of World War Two anti-invasion defences such as the region’s inland ‘stop lines’, pill-boxes, and other fortifications. Dave utilises geographical and archaeological techniques of surveying, landscape analysis, aerial photography, and examination of campaign maps in this work, and continues to work with Dr Stephan Harrison of Exeter University and PhD researcher David Capps-Tunwell in these pieces of research.

Contact details:

Room DV3266
University of Toronto Mississauga
3359 Mississauga Road
Mississauga
ON L5L 1C6

Email: david.passmore@utoronto.ca


Matthew Rech

Matthew RechMatthew is a Teaching fellow in Human Geography in the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology. His current research activity builds upon Doctoral and Postdoctoral research around the theme of 'A critical geopolitics of RAF recruitment' which considered the means by which British military recruiting practices represent, and allow for the performance of, common-sense geopolitics of the military and the state.

Matthew’s research is concerned with three lines of inquiry:

  • Military Geographies and militarism, and an understanding of the effects of militarisation on people and places.
  • Critical geopolitical cultures and the everyday
  • Geographies of representation, visuality and materiality

Along with his PhD, Matthew holds a BA (Hons) degree in Geography from Newcastle University (2007), and an MA in Human Geography Research (Newcastle University, 2008). Matthew was a Teaching Fellow in Political Geography for the academic year 2011-12 in the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology at Newcastle University, and an ESRC Postdoctoral Fellow during the 2012-13 year in the school of Architecture, Planning and Landscape.

Contact details:

Dr Matthew F. Rech

Room 4.31 Claremont Bridge
School of Geography Politics and Sociology
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
UK

Tel: 0191 208 8603
Email: matthew.rech@ncl.ac.uk

Staff webpage: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/gps/staff/profile/matthew.rech


Jackie Leach Scully

Jackie Leach Scully Jackie is Co-Director of the Policy, Ethics and Life Sciences (PEALS) Research Centre of Newcastle University. Her military, war and security research interests focus on exploring the social, ethical and political aspects of the identification of human remains after mass deaths in conflicts, genocide, terrorism and natural disasters. Her first work in this area considered issues in the use of DNA identification techniques following the discovery of the remains of 250 First World War soldiers in a mass grave at Fromelles, Northern France, and she is currently collaborating with colleagues at the University of Sydney on further research in this area.

Jackie’s future research will continue to focus on her overarching research interest: the way in which people and societies make sense of the moral implications of new technologies, particularly those developing from the life sciences, in terms of areas like identity, embodiment and regulation. Among other things her previous research has examined public attitudes to prenatal sex selection, ethical issues in gene therapy, decisions made by donors of surplus embryos to stem cell research, and the impact of policy regulating assisted conception on beliefs about disability and disabled people. In keeping with these themes, the 2014 PEALS annual international symposium will focus on ‘Technologies of identification and disaster communities’. Jackie is happy to hear from students interested in bioethics, particularly in areas of genetic medicine, reproductive medicine, neuroscience, pharmacogenomics, the pharmaceutical industry, moral reasoning and identity, disability, feminist bioethics, and global bioethics.

Contact details:

Prof. Jackie Leach Scully
PEALS Research Centre,
4th Floor Claremont Bridge
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
UK

Tel: 0191 208 7520
Email: jackie.scully@ncl.ac.uk


Justin Sikora

Justin Sikora Justin is a final year PhD candidate at the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies at Newcastle University. His research deals with on-site interpretation at historic battlefields and how this contributes to conceptualising the perceived value of battlefield heritage.

He is currently working as a research assistant with Prof. Rachel Woodward on the AHRC-funded exploratory study, Caring for post-military futures: alternative development futures for former military sites in the UK. This projects explores 'forgotten' military sites throughout the UK, and their related heritage management issues.

Justin holds a Master of Arts degree in World Heritage Studies from the Brandenburg University of Technology in Cottbus, Germany and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Tennessee - Knoxville in French with a Minor in History.

Contact details:

Email: j.p.sikora@ncl.ac.uk


Professor Peter Stone OBE

Peter Stone Peter is Head of School of Arts and Cultures and Professor of Heritage Studies at Newcastle University. He was awarded the OBE in 2011 for services to heritage education. In 2003, Peter was advisor to the Ministry of Defence regarding the identification and protection of the archaeological cultural heritage in Iraq. He has remained active in researching the relationship between cultural heritage experts and the armed forces and has retained a close working relationship with the military in an attempt to refine attitudes and develop processes for the better protection of cultural property in times of conflict. He has written extensively on this topic (see www.ncl.ac.uk/sacs/staff/profile/peter.stone#tab_publications)and, for example, as part of this work, he co-edited, with Joanne Farchakh Bajjaly, The Destruction of Cultural Heritage in Iraq (2008) and edited Cultural Heritage, Ethics and the Military (2011). His 4-tier approach for cultural heritage experts working with the military (published in Antiquity in March 2013) has been met with interest and support from both the UK Ministry of Defence and NATO.

Peter is the Chair of the UK’s National Committee of the Blue Shield and Secretary General of the Association of National Committees of the Blue Shield. The Blue Shield is the protective emblem specified in the 1954 Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict for marking cultural sites to give them protection from attack. The Blue Shield network includes organizations dealing with museums, galleries, archives, audiovisual supports, libraries, monuments, and sites. The mission of Blue Shield is to work for the protection of the world's cultural heritage.

Contact details:

School of Arts and Cultures
Armstrong Building
Newcastle University
Newcastle Upon Tyne
NE1 7RU

Email: peter.stone@ncl.ac.uk Staff Profile: www.ncl.ac.uk/sacs/staff/profile/peter.stone


Alison Williams

Alison WilliamsAlison is a Lecturer in Human Geography, based in the School of Geography Politics and Sociology, Newcastle University.

Alison's research interests are predominantly concerned with seeking to understand how aviation (primarily military aviation) is used, and acts, to project power across space. Within this her work has extended to elucidating how the incursions of military aircraft into foreign airspace affect notions of sovereignty and territorial integrity, and considerations of how military aviation is used to enforce and maintain international boundaries (using Iraq's and the US-Mexico borders as case studies) and how they are being increasingly used to violate them. Primarily, however, this research has been focused through two major projects. The first of these, and the subject of her PhD research, focused upon analysing the use of aviation (both military and civil) to territorialise the Pacific as US space during the inter-war period. The second, for which she held an ESRC Research Fellowship (2008-2011), concerns how UK military airspaces are represented, how they are enacted, and how their military users experience them. This project has led to a number of publications, including papers for Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers and Political Geography (see publications).

Alison has an interest in boundary issues that encompass and go beyond her specific interests in aviation. To this end, she has written about the use of military aviation to enforce and violate boundaries, and with John Donaldson (IBRU, Durham), on the boundary-related work of the political geographer Stephen B Jones, and about maritime boundary security issues in the East China Sea (see publications).

Alison also has research interest in the emerging graduate skills agenda, especially as it relates to student armed-service unit experiences. Within this she is currently working on two projects. The first is concerned with analysing the graduate skills which student members of the University's armed service units are able to gain through their membership of these organisations. A report from this project is available here. The second builds from this to look at the ‘value’ of university armed service units more widely across civil society.

Alison joined the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology in 2008. Prior to this she was Lecturer in Human Geography at Liverpool University, and before that Research Associate in the International Boundaries Research Unit, Durham University. Alison holds a PhD in Human Geography from University of Hull, an MA International Relations from Keele University, and a BA (Hons) Geography from Liverpool University.

Alison leads the Stage 3 Newcastle University module GEO3102 Geopolitical Thought and Practice, and teaches on the Stage 2 GEO2047 Political Geography and GEO2015 Military Environments and Landscapes modules. She currently supervises two PhD students. Matthew Rech's PhD analyses the critical geopolitics of RAF recruitment and Daniel Bos’ PhD investigates the critical geopolitics of military first-person-shooter video games.

Alison is currently Vice-Chair of the RGS-IBG Political Geography Research Group and a member of the Northumbrian Universities Military Education Committee.

Contact details

Dr Alison Williams
School of Geography Politics and Sociology
Daysh Building
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
UK

Tel: 0191 208 8489
Email: alison.williams1@ncl.ac.uk
Staff webpage: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/gps/staff/profile/alison.williams1


Rachel Woodward

Rachel Woodward Rachel Woodward is Professor of Human Geography, and is based in the School of Geography Politics and Sociology at Newcastle University. Her research interests lie in two broad areas. The first is the study of the ways in which military activities and militarism are geographically constituted and expressed. This work includes studies of the politics of military land use, military environmentalism and representations of conservation and environmental protection on the defence estate, the development consequences of the conversion of military sites into to post-military uses, and military landscapes. The second research area is the sociology and culture of armed forces, which includes studies of gender politics in the armed forces, soldier identities, and the representation of military personnel in text and image.

Currently, Rachel is researching the ‘value’ of the University Armed Service Units (along with Dr Alison Williams and Dr Neil Jenkings), and is also undertaking a study entitled ‘Women in the British armed forces: lessons from Afghanistan’. She has also recently finished an ESRC project on the social production of the contemporary British military memoir (with Neil Jenkings), on the representation and interpretation of military landscapes, and is continuing to disseminate the findings of this research. She teaches a Stage 3 Newcastle University module GEO3063 Militarism: Space and Society, and on a Stage 2 module GEO2105 Military Environments and Landscapes Fieldcourse. Rachel joined the School of Geography Politics and Sociology in 2005. Prior to this, she worked for nine years in the Centre for Rural Economy and the School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development (both Newcastle University), and has also held research posts at Leicester University and University of Wales, Lampeter. She holds a PhD from Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London, and a BA degree in Geography from the University of Exeter.

Rachel welcomes enquiries from students interested in conducting research on any aspect of military geographies, including the sociology of the military, representation of militarism and military activities, and on military environments and landscapes.

Contact details:

Prof. Rachel Woodward
School of Geography Politics and Sociology
Daysh Building
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU

Tel: 0191 208 6434
Email: r.e.woodward@ncl.ac.uk
Staff webpage: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/gps/staff/profile/rachel.woodward